As we approach Valnetine’s/Singles’ Awareness Day, here’s some data to chew on:

  • 21% of couples have felt closer to their spouse/partner because of exchanges they had online or via text message.
  • 27% of internet users in a marriage or committed relationship have an email account that they share with their partner. 
  • 18% of online 18-29 year olds have argued with a partner about the amount of time one of them spent online (compared with 8% of all online couples).

Plus much more data candy for your pre-Valentine week. Enjoy!! http://pewrsr.ch/1csCijM

http://pewrsr.ch/1bt6sC5

How some of the most popular cell phone activities have grown, over time:
In 2010, 76% of cell owners used their phone to take pictures. NOW: 82%
TEXTING: 2007 = 58%. Now = 80%
ACCESSING THE INTERNET: 2008 = 25%. Now = 56%
SEND/RECEIVE EMAIL: 2007 = 19%. Now = 50%
RECORD VIDEO: 2007 = 18%. Now = 44%
DOWNLOAD APPS: 2009= 22%. Now = 43%
LOOK FOR HEALTH INFO: 2010= 17%. Now = 31%
CHECK BANK ACCOUNT: 2011 = 18%. Now = 29%

How some of the most popular cell phone activities have grown, over time:

  • In 2010, 76% of cell owners used their phone to take pictures. NOW: 82%
  • TEXTING: 2007 = 58%. Now = 80%
  • ACCESSING THE INTERNET: 2008 = 25%. Now = 56%
  • SEND/RECEIVE EMAIL: 2007 = 19%. Now = 50%
  • RECORD VIDEO: 2007 = 18%. Now = 44%
  • DOWNLOAD APPS: 2009= 22%. Now = 43%
  • LOOK FOR HEALTH INFO: 2010= 17%. Now = 31%
  • CHECK BANK ACCOUNT: 2011 = 18%. Now = 29%

How often does one of these mobile phone problems happen to you:

  • Dopped calls
  • Unwanted sales or marketing calls
  • Spam or unwanted text messages
  • Slow download speeds that prevent things from loading as quickly as you would like them to

We asked, and just published the answers:

Some 88% of American adults have cell phones, according to this survey, and, of those cell owners:

  • 72% of cell owners experience dropped calls at least occasionally. Some 32% of cell owners say they encounter this problem at least a few times a week or more frequently than that.
  • 68% of cell owners receive unwanted sales or marketing calls at one time or another. And 25% of cell owners encounter this problem at least a few times a week or more frequently.

Some 79% of cell phone owners say they use text messaging on their cells. We asked them if they got spam or unwanted texts:

  • 69% of those who are texters say they get unwanted spam or text messages. Of those texters, 25% face problems with spam/unwanted texts at least weekly.

Some 55% of cell phone owners say they use their phones to go online— to browse the internet, exchange emails, or download apps. We asked them if they experience slow download speeds that prevent things from loading as quickly as they would like:

  • 77% of cell internet users say they experience slow download speeds that prevent things from loading as quickly as they would like. Of those cell internet users, 46% face slow download speeds weekly or more frequently.

Read more …

New report: Teens, Smartphones & Texting

Texting dominates teens’ general communication choices, and 23% of teens own a smartphone.  The volume of texting among teens has risen from 50 texts a day in 2009 to 60 texts for the median teen text user. Among teen communication choices:

  • 63% say that they use text to communicate with others every day.
  • 39% of teens make and receive voice calls on their mobile phones every day.
  • 35% of all teens socialize with others in person outside of school on a daily basis.
  • 29% of all teens exchange messages daily through social network sites.
  • 22% of teens use instant messaging daily to talk to others.
  • 19% of teens talk on landlines with people in their lives daily.
  • 6% of teens exchange email daily.
Our new report explores the tools teens use to communicate, with a particular focus on mobile devices, and then places the use of those tools in the broader context of how teens choose to communicate with people in their lives. Read more
Both cell ownership and text messaging are nearly universal among 18-24 year olds—95% own a cell phone and 97% of these cell owners use text messaging. 
18-24 year olds send or receive an average of  109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages  per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts  per day, or around 1,500 messages per month.
To put these numbers in comparison, the average of 109.5 texts  per day among 18-24 year olds is more than double the comparable figure  for 25-34 year olds, and twenty-three times the figure for text  messaging users who are 65 or older. Read more in our most recent report, Americans and Text Messaging.

Both cell ownership and text messaging are nearly universal among 18-24 year olds—95% own a cell phone and 97% of these cell owners use text messaging. 

18-24 year olds send or receive an average of 109.5 text messages per day—that works out to more than 3,200 messages per month. The median 18-24 year old texter sends or receives 50 texts per day, or around 1,500 messages per month.

To put these numbers in comparison, the average of 109.5 texts per day among 18-24 year olds is more than double the comparable figure for 25-34 year olds, and twenty-three times the figure for text messaging users who are 65 or older. Read more in our most recent report, Americans and Text Messaging.

What we’re reading: Smartphones and search

Google, a Giant in Mobile Search, Seeks New Ways to Make It Pay

by Claire Cain Miller, New York Times
April 24, 2011

 At first, Google engineers thought people would talk to its voice search service as if they were talking to a person — “you know, it’s my anniversary, and I’d love to take my wife somewhere really romantic to eat, do you have any ideas?” — so it taught the service to filter out unnecessary words. But it turned out that Google had already trained people into thinking in keywords, so they knew to search “romantic restaurants” even when speaking instead of typing.        

Read more at nytimes.com

Smartphones: A New Tool for Population Heath Surveys

from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
June 14, 2011

Could the rocketing use of smartphones be a boon for population health surveys? Trent Buskirk, an associate professor of biostatistics at the St. Louis University School of Public Health, thinks so.

At a panel about Innovations in Population Health Surveys at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting, Buskirk noted that the opportunity to use smartphones for surveys is increasing now that 85 percent of U.S. households have a cell phone–and 37% of those cell phones are smartphones.

Read more at rwjf.org

More links:

Further Reading
Report: Teens and Distracted Driving (2009)
Report: Adults and Cell Phone Distractions (2010)

Further Reading

"[My dad] drives like he’s drunk. His phone is just like sitting right in front of his face, and he puts his knees on the bottom of the steering wheel and tries to text."

9th/10th grade boy, talking about his father’s driving habits.
Read the full report: Teens and Distracted Driving (2009) — see also Adults and Cell Phone Distractions (2010)

Texting is the form of communication that has grown the most for  teens during the last four years. The data show that between 2006 and  2009 the percent of teens who use texting to contact friends outside of  school on a daily basis has gone from 27% to 54%. Face-to-face contact,  instant messaging, mobile voice and social network messaging have  remained flat during the same period, while use of email and the  landline phone have decreased slightly. Read more…
Source: Teens and Mobile Phones, by Amanda Lenhart, Rich Ling, Scott Campbell, and Kristen Purcell (2010), based on Pew Internet September 2009 survey data

Texting is the form of communication that has grown the most for teens during the last four years. The data show that between 2006 and 2009 the percent of teens who use texting to contact friends outside of school on a daily basis has gone from 27% to 54%. Face-to-face contact, instant messaging, mobile voice and social network messaging have remained flat during the same period, while use of email and the landline phone have decreased slightly. Read more…

Source: Teens and Mobile Phones, by Amanda Lenhart, Rich Ling, Scott Campbell, and Kristen Purcell (2010), based on Pew Internet September 2009 survey data