Happy 15th birthday, Google!

“Overall, what would you say is the most NEGATIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?”

“Overall, what would you say is the most NEGATIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?”

(Source: pewinternet.org)

The perceived impact of the internet on student research, in a word:
“Overall, what would you say is the most POSITIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?
A survey of Advanced Placement & National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age. They say the internet & digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research work, but are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans”. Check out the full, detailed report, out today: http://pewrsr.ch/Ujc6yh

The perceived impact of the internet on student research, in a word:

Overall, what would you say is the most POSITIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?

A survey of Advanced Placement & National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age. They say the internet & digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research work, but are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans”. Check out the full, detailed report, out today: http://pewrsr.ch/Ujc6yh

(Source: pewinternet.org)

Blast from the past: Popular search terms in 2004

Took a deep dive into our archives and found this little nugget:

According to AskJeeves, the top searches for the week of Oct. 8, 2004 were: online dictionary, music lyrics, games, halloween costumes, jokes, baby names, quotes, Britney spears, Paris Hilton, poems.

Or from Yahoo: Eminem, Britney Spears, Usher, Mt. St. Helens, Nelly, Register to Vote, Halloween costumes, Jo Jo, Paris Hilton, Green Day, NASCAR, Christina Aguilera, Hilary Duff, NFL, Linkin Park, Slipknot, Drudge Report, Alicia Keys, John Kerry, My Boo

Or from the Lycos 50, from Oct. 2, 2004: Airline Flight Tracking, Clay Aiken, Paris, Hilton, Pamela Anderson, Halloween costumes, Britney Spears, Michelle Vieth, Halloween, NFL, poker, KaZaA, Brooke Burke, beheadings in Iraq, Christmas, Lindsay Lohan, Star Wars 3, The Olsen Twins, WWE. Dragonball, Baseball

Read more in our 2005 report on search engine users.

(Source: pewinternet.org)

86% of smartphone owners used their phone in the past month to make real-time queries to help them meet friends, solve problems, or settle arguments.
We’re seeing that users’ ability to access data immediately through apps and web browsers and through contact with their social networks is creating a new culture of real-time information seekers and problem solvers. We’ve previously documented some of the ways that people perform just-in-time services with their cell phones; and now we find additional evidence of this phenomenon in our new report out today.
How often do you use your phone for just-in-time info?

86% of smartphone owners used their phone in the past month to make real-time queries to help them meet friends, solve problems, or settle arguments.

We’re seeing that users’ ability to access data immediately through apps and web browsers and through contact with their social networks is creating a new culture of real-time information seekers and problem solvers. We’ve previously documented some of the ways that people perform just-in-time services with their cell phones; and now we find additional evidence of this phenomenon in our new report out today.

How often do you use your phone for just-in-time info?

Infographic for your Monday morning - Is personalized search getting too personal? User Thoughts on Personalized Search
(Via Search Engine Journal)
(Read more on search engine use)

Infographic for your Monday morning - Is personalized search getting too personal? User Thoughts on Personalized Search

(Via Search Engine Journal)

(Read more on search engine use)

Great analogy to Disney at the end of this Atlantic article about our new report on search engine use and users’ views on personalized search results and targeted ads

Among search engine users, Google dominance continues and it is far and away the search engine they report using most often.  Fully 83% of searchers use Google more often than any other search engine.  Yahoo is a very distant second at just 6%.  In 2004, the gap between these two search leaders was much narrower.  At that time, 47% said that Google was the search engine they used most often while 26% named Yahoo. 

Among search engine users, Google dominance continues and it is far and away the search engine they report using most often.  Fully 83% of searchers use Google more often than any other search engine.  Yahoo is a very distant second at just 6%.  In 2004, the gap between these two search leaders was much narrower.  At that time, 47% said that Google was the search engine they used most often while 26% named Yahoo. 

Search engines and users’ views about personalized search results & targeted ads

In our February 2012 survey, we included several questions asking how respondents feel about search engines and other websites collecting information about them and using it to either shape their search results or target advertising to them. While users are more satisfied than ever with the quality of search results, clear majorities of internet and search users disapprove of sites collecting personal info and online targeted advertising.

Read more in our new report, out today: Search Engine Use 2012

New report: Search and email still top the list of most popular online activities
Search and email remain the two online activities that are nearly  universal among adult internet users, as 92% of online adults use search  engines to find information on the Web, and a similar number (92%) use  email.
Since we began measuring adults’ online  activities in the last decade, these two behaviors have consistently  ranked as the most popular, even as new platforms, broadband and mobile  devices continue to reshape the way Americans use the internet and web.  Even as early as 2002, more than eight in ten online adults were using  search engines, and more than nine in ten online adults were emailing.
Read the full report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Search-and-email.aspx

New report: Search and email still top the list of most popular online activities

Search and email remain the two online activities that are nearly universal among adult internet users, as 92% of online adults use search engines to find information on the Web, and a similar number (92%) use email.

Since we began measuring adults’ online activities in the last decade, these two behaviors have consistently ranked as the most popular, even as new platforms, broadband and mobile devices continue to reshape the way Americans use the internet and web. Even as early as 2002, more than eight in ten online adults were using search engines, and more than nine in ten online adults were emailing.

Read the full report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Search-and-email.aspx

What we’re reading: Smartphones and search

Google, a Giant in Mobile Search, Seeks New Ways to Make It Pay

by Claire Cain Miller, New York Times
April 24, 2011

 At first, Google engineers thought people would talk to its voice search service as if they were talking to a person — “you know, it’s my anniversary, and I’d love to take my wife somewhere really romantic to eat, do you have any ideas?” — so it taught the service to filter out unnecessary words. But it turned out that Google had already trained people into thinking in keywords, so they knew to search “romantic restaurants” even when speaking instead of typing.        

Read more at nytimes.com

Smartphones: A New Tool for Population Heath Surveys

from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
June 14, 2011

Could the rocketing use of smartphones be a boon for population health surveys? Trent Buskirk, an associate professor of biostatistics at the St. Louis University School of Public Health, thinks so.

At a panel about Innovations in Population Health Surveys at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting, Buskirk noted that the opportunity to use smartphones for surveys is increasing now that 85 percent of U.S. households have a cell phone–and 37% of those cell phones are smartphones.

Read more at rwjf.org

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