2 story-telling charts from a brand new report on the state of the news media in America:

Today, our friends over at the Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project released their annual, comprehensive report on the State of the News Media, including special reports about the revenue picture for news, the growth in digital reporting, social media and news, and developments around digital video. It’s an absolute treasure trove; Dive in.

We’ll pull some of the key charts from the report and post them here; stay tuned …

Links for charts above: http://pewrsr.ch/NRLCHV and http://pewrsr.ch/OT4A1L

Our friends over at the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism just released their behemoth annual report on the state of the news media. Lots to take in here. http://pewrsr.ch/WRaVgU

Our friends over at the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism just released their behemoth annual report on the state of the news media. Lots to take in here. http://pewrsr.ch/WRaVgU

More on Facebook/Twitter and the news - http://pewrsr.ch/FQRIlJ

(Source: stateofthemedia.org)

A New Era of the Digital Revolution: The Role of Mobile Devices & Social Media in News Consumption
(From our friends at The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism)

A New Era of the Digital Revolution: The Role of Mobile Devices & Social Media in News Consumption

(From our friends at The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism)

pewresearch:

A new report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. 

pewresearch:

A new report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. 

Last week’s top stories in social media

From the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism New Media Index:

Last week, Apple news was the top shared story on blogs

Korean pop group Super Junior won the top slot on Twitter, with Justin Beiber in second place

And the FedEx delivery man throwing a computer monitor over a fence scored first place on YouTube.

nprfreshair:

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism looked at how mainstream media outlets use Twitter.

A new report from PEJ, based on analysis of more than 3,600 tweets over the course of a week, finds that news organizations use “Twitter primarily as an added means to disseminate their own material.” Read more in the full report at journalism.org.

nprfreshair:

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism looked at how mainstream media outlets use Twitter.

A new report from PEJ, based on analysis of more than 3,600 tweets over the course of a week, finds that news organizations use “Twitter primarily as an added means to disseminate their own material.” Read more in the full report at journalism.org.

Pew Internet Director Lee Rainie recently spoke at TEDx University of Illinois about the rise of “networked individuals,” a concept that he and Barry Wellman explore in their forthcoming book, Networked: The New Social Operating System. He described how revolutions in social networking, the internet, and mobile connectivity have changed the way that peope deal with each other and communities in their lives and how people can function more effectively in this new environment.

In the news: Knight Foundation adds media technology leaders to its board

MIAMI – (October 25, 2011) – Knight Foundation today emphasized the importance of technology and media innovation on the delivery of news and information to communities by appointing three of the nation’s most influential new media leaders to its board of trustees.
Joichi Ito, the director of MIT’s Media Lab, John Palfrey, professor at Harvard Law School and co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and Chris Hughes, the Facebook co-founder have been elected to join Knight’s board of trustees.

Read more…

In the news: Knight Foundation adds media technology leaders to its board

MIAMI – (October 25, 2011) – Knight Foundation today emphasized the importance of technology and media innovation on the delivery of news and information to communities by appointing three of the nation’s most influential new media leaders to its board of trustees.

Joichi Ito, the director of MIT’s Media Lab, John Palfrey, professor at Harvard Law School and co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and Chris Hughes, the Facebook co-founder have been elected to join Knight’s board of trustees.

Read more

The tablet revolution: How people use tablets and what it means for the future of news
A new report from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (in collaboration with The Economist Group) reveals who tablet users are, how they get news —and if they will pay for it:

Eighteen months after the introduction of the iPad, 11% of U.S. adults now own a tablet computer of some kind. About half (53%) get news on their tablet every day, and they read long articles as well as get headlines. But a majority says they would not be willing to pay for news content on these devices, according to the most detailed study to date of tablet users and how they interact with this new technology. 

Read more at journalism.org

The tablet revolution: How people use tablets and what it means for the future of news

A new report from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (in collaboration with The Economist Group) reveals who tablet users are, how they get news —and if they will pay for it:

Eighteen months after the introduction of the iPad, 11% of U.S. adults now own a tablet computer of some kind. About half (53%) get news on their tablet every day, and they read long articles as well as get headlines. But a majority says they would not be willing to pay for news content on these devices, according to the most detailed study to date of tablet users and how they interact with this new technology. 

Read more at journalism.org

What effect do tablets have on news consumption habits?

The Project for Excellence in Journalism (a fellow Pew Research project) and The Economist Group have collaborated on the most comprehensive and detailed analysis to date of tablet users and how they get news on their tablets: To what extent are people using their tablets for news rather than other activities? Are they getting more news now than before they had their tablets? 

The multi-phase study of nearly 1,200 tablet users and nearly 900 tablet news users offers unprecedented findings on many questions, and will be available on www.journalism.org on Tuesday, October 25.

How have mobile devices changed your news consumption habits?

According to the latest news interest index from the Pew Research center for the People & the Press:

The public focused most closely last week on two interrelated news stories – the nation’s struggling economy and the anti-Wall Street protests that have now spread far beyond their beginnings in New York City.

Two-in-ten (20%) say their top story was reports about the condition of the U.S. economy. That’s about the same as the 18% that say their top story was the Occupy Wall Street protests in New York and other cities, according to the latest weekly News Interest Index survey, conducted Oct. 13-16 among 1,007 adults by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. One week earlier, the protests did not rank high among the public’s top stories, but as the movement has spread – and coverage has ramped up – so has public interest.

Read more

Tags: media news

The Media Primary: How News Media and Blogs Have Eyed the Presidential Contenders during the First Phase of the 2012 Race - Project for Excellence in Journalism

In the first months of the race for president, that weeding out period  before citizens ever vote or caucus, Texas Governor Rick Perry has  received the most coverage and the most positive coverage from the news  media of any GOP contender, according to a new study by the Pew Research  Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. 


The study, which examines news media and blog coverage of 10 GOP contenders as well as the president, also finds:

• News coverage of Herman Cain has been moderately more positive (28%) than negative (23%) overall. But most of that flattering narrative has come recently. From May through July, however, Cain was largely ignored, and his coverage was more negative or mixed.
• Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann’s coverage has been substantially more positive (31%) than negative (23%). But she had the wildest ride of any candidate. She moved from a long shot to a surprise contender, to an object of scrutiny, to a straw poll winner and back to unlikely underdog. At the same time, she has been largely pummeled in the blogs throughout.
• Though she never entered the race, Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin was the fourth-most-covered Republican figure in news coverage, and the most-discussed candidate in blogs. And despite her complaints about what she calls the “lamestream media,” Palin enjoyed coverage that was considerably more positive than negative—by a factor of almost 3-2—and much more positive than she received among bloggers.

Read more at journalism.org

The Media Primary: How News Media and Blogs Have Eyed the Presidential Contenders during the First Phase of the 2012 Race - Project for Excellence in Journalism

In the first months of the race for president, that weeding out period before citizens ever vote or caucus, Texas Governor Rick Perry has received the most coverage and the most positive coverage from the news media of any GOP contender, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. 

The study, which examines news media and blog coverage of 10 GOP contenders as well as the president, also finds:

News coverage of Herman Cain has been moderately more positive (28%) than negative (23%) overall. But most of that flattering narrative has come recently. From May through July, however, Cain was largely ignored, and his coverage was more negative or mixed.

Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann’s coverage has been substantially more positive (31%) than negative (23%). But she had the wildest ride of any candidate. She moved from a long shot to a surprise contender, to an object of scrutiny, to a straw poll winner and back to unlikely underdog. At the same time, she has been largely pummeled in the blogs throughout.

Though she never entered the race, Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin was the fourth-most-covered Republican figure in news coverage, and the most-discussed candidate in blogs. And despite her complaints about what she calls the “lamestream media,” Palin enjoyed coverage that was considerably more positive than negative—by a factor of almost 3-2—and much more positive than she received among bloggers.

Read more at journalism.org

In case you missed it: We recently came out with a great new report with the Project for Excellence in Journalism about how people get news and information about their local community. Some of the major findings include:
Local TV news remains the most popular source for local information in America, but adults rely on it primarily for just three subjects—weather, breaking news and to a lesser extent traffic.
Newspapers (both print and on the web) are the source Americans turn to most for a wider range of information than any other source.
The internet has a strong hold in the local community, as web-only outlets are now the key source of information on some key subjects such as education or local business and restaurants. Among adults under age 40, the internet rivals or surpasses other platforms on every single topic area except one (breaking local news). 
Want to learn more? You can explore for yourself the changing ecosystem of how people get local news with this interactive infographic, or read the report in full on our website.

In case you missed it: We recently came out with a great new report with the Project for Excellence in Journalism about how people get news and information about their local community. Some of the major findings include:

  • Local TV news remains the most popular source for local information in America, but adults rely on it primarily for just three subjects—weather, breaking news and to a lesser extent traffic.
  • Newspapers (both print and on the web) are the source Americans turn to most for a wider range of information than any other source.
  • The internet has a strong hold in the local community, as web-only outlets are now the key source of information on some key subjects such as education or local business and restaurants. Among adults under age 40, the internet rivals or surpasses other platforms on every single topic area except one (breaking local news). 

Want to learn more? You can explore for yourself the changing ecosystem of how people get local news with this interactive infographic, or read the report in full on our website.

What we’re reading: “The world’s first location-aware digital newspaper”

TapIn’s social layer is based on Gigs, a feature borrowed from the original Tackable phone app. Deliberately non-specific, Gigs simply allows users to place a red pin on the map and attach a post of some kind. This could be a restaurant recommendation or comment, but most intriguingly, it could be a question — “I’m here and have an hour to kill, anything cool to do nearby?” or “Does anybody know why traffic on this road is tied up?” or “What’s the story behind this interesting-looking building,” or “Can someone recommend a plumber who will come out here on a weekend?”

What we’re reading: “The world’s first location-aware digital newspaper”

TapIn’s social layer is based on Gigs, a feature borrowed from the original Tackable phone app. Deliberately non-specific, Gigs simply allows users to place a red pin on the map and attach a post of some kind. This could be a restaurant recommendation or comment, but most intriguingly, it could be a question — “I’m here and have an hour to kill, anything cool to do nearby?” or “Does anybody know why traffic on this road is tied up?” or “What’s the story behind this interesting-looking building,” or “Can someone recommend a plumber who will come out here on a weekend?”