Did you know: Technology users are generally library users. A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. In fact, members of the high engagement groups are more likely to use the internet than lower engagement groups.
A new way of looking at public library engagement in America: http://pewrsr.ch/1iZCrUb

Did you know: Technology users are generally library users. A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. In fact, members of the high engagement groups are more likely to use the internet than lower engagement groups.

A new way of looking at public library engagement in America: http://pewrsr.ch/1iZCrUb

"A key theme in these survey findings is that many people see acquiring information as a highly social process in which trusted helpers matter,” Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project and a main author of the report said. “One of the main resources that people tap when they have questions is the networks of expertise. Even some of the most self-sufficient information consumers in our sample find that libraries and librarians can be part of their networks when they have problems to solve or decisions to make."

PBS Newshour: Turns out the most engaged library users also biggest tech users

We have a new report out today, a typology of Americans’ engagement with public libraries. It caps off the past three years of research the Pew Research Center has produced on the topic of public libraries’ changing role in Americans’ lives and communities.

Some of the main findings:

  • Americans’ library habits do not exist in a vacuum: People’s connection—or lack of connection—with public libraries is part of their broader information and social landscape. As a rule, people who have extensive economic, social, technological, and cultural resources are also more likely to use and value libraries as part of those networks. 
  • Life stage and special circumstances are linked to increased library use and higher engagement with information: Deeper connections with public libraries are often associated with key life moments such as having a child, seeking a job, being a student, and going through a situation in which research and data can help inform a decision.
  • Technology users are generally library users: A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. 

Check out the full report on our website! And if you’re curious about the basic data, this earlier report summarizes the measures we used to explore Americans’ engagement with public libraries.

Technology is a fast-paced beast that is changing Americans’ reading habits. Half of Americans now own a tablet or e-reader and libraries have responded by expanding their digital offerings.

But what hasn’t changed is folks’ love for reading; and libraries play an important role.

In advance of the American Library Association’s Midwinter Convention (#alamw14), we’ve rounded up some of our most key facts on Americans and libraries, and we’ll be sharing them throughout the day. http://pewrsr.ch/1aPI3HN

One of the most highly valued library services in our new survey: Having a quiet, safe place.
What’s most important to you in your library?
Read more

One of the most highly valued library services in our new survey: Having a quiet, safe place.

What’s most important to you in your library?

Read more

Tags: Libraries

If your local library closed, what impact would it have on your family and your community?
BRAND NEW REPORT out today finds thatAmericans strongly value the role of public libraries in their communities, both for providing access to materials and resources and for promoting literacy and improving the overall quality of life.54% of Americans have used a public library in the past year, and 72% live in a “library household.”
More: http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/12/11/libraries-in-communities/

If your local library closed, what impact would it have on your family and your community?

BRAND NEW REPORT out today finds thatAmericans strongly value the role of public libraries in their communities, both for providing access to materials and resources and for promoting literacy and improving the overall quality of life.54% of Americans have used a public library in the past year, and 72% live in a “library household.”

More: http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/12/11/libraries-in-communities/

explore-blog:

Absolutely brilliant cartoon by Randy Glasbergen, explaining in modern terms why we have books. 

And this is why we study libraries in the digital age at Pew Internet! http://libraries.pewinternet.org/

explore-blog:

Absolutely brilliant cartoon by Randy Glasbergen, explaining in modern terms why we have books

And this is why we study libraries in the digital age at Pew Internet! http://libraries.pewinternet.org/

(Source: , via npr)

Fun with charts: We’ve added a data-heavy appendix to our latest report on libaries + the digital age, which includes generational breakdowns. Dive in and splash around. http://pewrsr.ch/12z3uZo

Which of these possible new features offered by libraries would you use?

Which of these possible new features offered by libraries would you use?

Do you read? Surprisingly, 82% of Americans ages 16-29 have read at least one book in any format in the previous 12 months, significantly more than older adults.

This taken from a new special analysis out today that takes a deep dive into younger Americans’ library habits & expectations: http://pewrsr.ch/18dA75K

Slideshow: Tech trends, library stats, and how teens do research

Research Analyst Kathryn Zickuhr gave a presentation at the Westchester Library Association’s annual conference that touched on a lot of our recent findings on library use, as well as a broad overview of technology adoption among adults and teens and a quick look at how teens do research in the digital age. Take a look at her comprehensive slideshow.

It’s Children’s Book Week. 84% of parents who say libraries are important say libraries help teach their children a love of reading and books. Also:
55% of parents of children under 18 say their child has his/her own library card.
70% of parents say their child visited a public library in the past 12 months
Among children visited the library in the past year, 87% did so to borrow books.
58% of parents with children ages 5 and younger say they read to their child every day.
Does your child have a library card? How often does your child read? How often do you, yourself visit the library?

More

It’s Children’s Book Week. 84% of parents who say libraries are important say libraries help teach their children a love of reading and books. Also:

  • 55% of parents of children under 18 say their child has his/her own library card.
  • 70% of parents say their child visited a public library in the past 12 months
  • Among children visited the library in the past year, 87% did so to borrow books.
  • 58% of parents with children ages 5 and younger say they read to their child every day.
Does your child have a library card? How often does your child read? How often do you, yourself visit the library?
"If you’re trying to raise a reader, you need your library. It’s too expensive and somewhat wasteful to buy the hundreds of books a young reader goes through in those first years of learning to read."

Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading: Select quotes from parents and library staff

"To me, a library … is a necessity. They have lots of things to offer. It’s kind of like home room for your community. If you want to find something out then you just ask. And they have a lot of things that they offer that they don’t advertise."

Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading: Select quotes from parents and library staff

"My parents were real big on [the library]. It was a treat for us, twice a week after church … You behave, you [get] to go to the library and get a book, get two books if you’re real good, read them that week and bring them back."

Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading: Select quotes from parents and library staff