"By 2025, we should have around 8.1 billion people online. Just imagine all those billions of people and ideas sharing and collaborating. Please don’t let me get hit by a bus. I want to live to experience this period which people will later call the Age of Collaboration."

Tiffany Shlain, filmmaker, host of the AOL series “The Future Starts Here” and founder of The Webby Awards, on what the future of the internet holds.

Friday thought of the day: What does the future hold for creativity/innovation?

"To realize its full potential, the Internet, as a medium and infrastructure (cables, etc.), has to be redefined, legislated, and maintained as a public domain where freedom of speech operates fully. Access to the Internet should be guaranteed globally in the same way as education, healthcare, food, and housing are guaranteed now in some countries."

— An associate professor at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, on future threats to the Net by 2025

More expert thoughts on Net threats in the future

Tech experts hope the open structure of the internet will prevail in the coming decade. But they also fear threats to the internet’s connectivity will arise from efforts by nations to restrict content, increased surveillance, and commercialization of too much online activity.

We’ve got a NEW REPORT from our expert series out today, and we’ll be spending the day talking all things future of the internet, the Web at 25, and the threats that face the Net in the coming decade. Follow along here and on Twitter with #web25.

63% of Americans think it would be a bad thing if U.S. airspace opened to personal drones.

"We will live in a world where many things won’t work, and nobody will know how to fix them,” says Howard Rheingold, an Internet sociologist.

Agree? Disagree?

The keynote for Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference kicks off at 1p.m. Eastern today, at which they are rumored to unveil some “Internet of Things”-like software. What have tech experts predicted for the future of the Internet of Things? Here are their thoughts — what are yours?

Of the three inventions we asked about in a recent report, Americans are most interested in riding in a driverless car: 48% would like to do this if given the opportunity, while 50% say this is something they would not want to do. College graduates are particularly interested in giving driverless cars a try: 59% of them would do so, while 62% of those with a high school diploma or less would not.
If given the opportunity, would you ride in one of Google’s new driverless cars?

Of the three inventions we asked about in a recent report, Americans are most interested in riding in a driverless car: 48% would like to do this if given the opportunity, while 50% say this is something they would not want to do. College graduates are particularly interested in giving driverless cars a try: 59% of them would do so, while 62% of those with a high school diploma or less would not.

If given the opportunity, would you ride in one of Google’s new driverless cars?

"Nearly everything in daily life will have a connected application associated with it. We can think of each person as a plug and each part of life as a socket—when you move from your bedroom to your kitchen to your car to your workplace and back again, each step along the way will be able to recognize your common identifier and tailor your experience accordingly."

— Patrick Stack, manager for the digital transformation group of Accenture Interactive, on the future of the Internet of Things.

"We will eventually be able to interact via thoughts, but it won’t be common by 2025. However, verbal interaction will be commonplace. We will talk to devices in essentially the same way we talk to other people. Yes, you will be permanently connected to the network via wearable devices. You will interact with these devices mostly by voice, as you would interact with another person. Centuries ago, rich people had servants, and in the future, we will all have cyberservants."

Hal Varian, chief economist for Google, on the future of the Internet of Things.

Will we all eventually have cyberservants? Your thoughts?

Even though videotex and teletext never took off the way the report’s authors thought they would (slow speeds and lack of common standards being the biggest obstacles), many of their projections will sound familiar:

  • Blurring of lines separating work and home
  • Fragmenting of traditional media
  • Privacy concerns
  • Data-based professions
  • Electronic banking
  • On-demand media
  • New kinds of relationships

Other predictions didn’t quite hit the mark, or at least haven’t yet become common:

  • Electronic voting
  • Diversified politics
  • Automated grocery shopping

READ MORE

"Finally, the refrigerator will talk to my smartphone to tell it I need to order milk before I am out."

Many experts say the rise of embedded and wearable computing (the “Internet of Things”) will bring the next revolution in digital technology. The upsides: enhanced health, convenience, productivity; The downsides: challenges to personal privacy, over-hyped expectations, and boggling tech complexity.

We’ve got a NEW REPORT today that reveals tech experts’ predictions for the future of the internetification of everything, and what it will mean for life. http://pewrsr.ch/1k0Y84z 

Your thoughts on the internetification of life?

"This is a device that can look in my windows, look in my backyard, take pictures or videos of me and my family," Smith says. "You’re not paranoid if they are, in fact, flying over your backyard and taking pictures of you at your barbecue."

In our recent poll, we found 63% of Americans said using drones for personal and commercial purposes would be a change for the worse.

Your thoughts on drones?

Last night’s episode of HBO’s “Silicon Valley” featured what we have found 48% of Americans would like to do: ride in a driverless car.

College graduates are particularly interested in giving driverless cars a try: 59% of them would do so, while 62% of those with a high school diploma or less would not. There is also a geographical split on this issue: Half of urban (52%) and suburban (51%) residents are interested in driverless cars, but just 36% of rural residents say this is something they’d find appealing.

Would you ride in a driverless car?