Karen Landis, user experience team leader for Belk.com, says the gigabit age will redefine what a “thought” actually is.
Good thing or bad thing?

Karen Landis, user experience team leader for Belk.com, says the gigabit age will redefine what a “thought” actually is.

Good thing or bad thing?

"People will regain the use of their thumbs for other purposes, as they experience the electronic co-presence of their family, friends, co-workers, boss, merchants, advertisers, spammers, stalkers, and government surveillance personnel."

Judith Perrolle, a professor at Northeastern University, on the future of killer apps in the gigabit age.

More: “The Internet of Things will take an ugly turn as hackers, cyber security swat teams, advertisers, and terrorists run amok through citizens’ and nations’ refrigerators, heating systems, power grids, and pacemakers. A sub-specialty of lawyers will arise to deal with Internet-connected objects’ product liability, in turn giving rise to laws absolving manufacturers of fault.”

Even more …

New report: The age of gigabit connectivity is dawning. How will it change our lives and societies? Experts weigh in.

The Pew Research Center and the Internet Innovation Alliance are hosting an event on Thursday morning (10 a.m. – noon) to showcase new findings from a canvassing of experts about the coming “gigabit age” and the “killer apps” that are likely to emerge. Come! Be sure to RSVP here.

"I don’t think the human race can retire en masse by 2025."

— Fred Baker on the future of AI, robotics, and jobs.

"By 2025, we should have around 8.1 billion people online. Just imagine all those billions of people and ideas sharing and collaborating. Please don’t let me get hit by a bus. I want to live to experience this period which people will later call the Age of Collaboration."

Tiffany Shlain, filmmaker, host of the AOL series “The Future Starts Here” and founder of The Webby Awards, on what the future of the internet holds.

Friday thought of the day: What does the future hold for creativity/innovation?

"To realize its full potential, the Internet, as a medium and infrastructure (cables, etc.), has to be redefined, legislated, and maintained as a public domain where freedom of speech operates fully. Access to the Internet should be guaranteed globally in the same way as education, healthcare, food, and housing are guaranteed now in some countries."

— An associate professor at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, on future threats to the Net by 2025

More expert thoughts on Net threats in the future

Tech experts hope the open structure of the internet will prevail in the coming decade. But they also fear threats to the internet’s connectivity will arise from efforts by nations to restrict content, increased surveillance, and commercialization of too much online activity.

We’ve got a NEW REPORT from our expert series out today, and we’ll be spending the day talking all things future of the internet, the Web at 25, and the threats that face the Net in the coming decade. Follow along here and on Twitter with #web25.

63% of Americans think it would be a bad thing if U.S. airspace opened to personal drones.

"We will live in a world where many things won’t work, and nobody will know how to fix them,” says Howard Rheingold, an Internet sociologist.

Agree? Disagree?

The keynote for Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference kicks off at 1p.m. Eastern today, at which they are rumored to unveil some “Internet of Things”-like software. What have tech experts predicted for the future of the Internet of Things? Here are their thoughts — what are yours?

Of the three inventions we asked about in a recent report, Americans are most interested in riding in a driverless car: 48% would like to do this if given the opportunity, while 50% say this is something they would not want to do. College graduates are particularly interested in giving driverless cars a try: 59% of them would do so, while 62% of those with a high school diploma or less would not.
If given the opportunity, would you ride in one of Google’s new driverless cars?

Of the three inventions we asked about in a recent report, Americans are most interested in riding in a driverless car: 48% would like to do this if given the opportunity, while 50% say this is something they would not want to do. College graduates are particularly interested in giving driverless cars a try: 59% of them would do so, while 62% of those with a high school diploma or less would not.

If given the opportunity, would you ride in one of Google’s new driverless cars?

"Nearly everything in daily life will have a connected application associated with it. We can think of each person as a plug and each part of life as a socket—when you move from your bedroom to your kitchen to your car to your workplace and back again, each step along the way will be able to recognize your common identifier and tailor your experience accordingly."

— Patrick Stack, manager for the digital transformation group of Accenture Interactive, on the future of the Internet of Things.