"Barnes & Noble Inc. said Thursday it will give $315 in e-books to customers who buy a Nook electronic reader in the bookseller’s stores — as long as they show them that they have another e-reader and want to make a switch."

Tags: ebooks news links

fastcompany:

A new survey by the American Library Association shows that 99.3% of  public libraries offer free access to the web even if you don’t have a  PC and 67% offer e-books. Summer just got a whole lot cooler. 
Picture via guillermogg on Flickr

fastcompany:

A new survey by the American Library Association shows that 99.3% of public libraries offer free access to the web even if you don’t have a PC and 67% offer e-books. Summer just got a whole lot cooler.

Picture via guillermogg on Flickr

(via fastcompany)

New report: E-reader ownership doubles in six months, while tablet ownership grows more slowly
Twelve percent of U.S. adults own an e-book reader as of May 2011, according to our latest report, up from 6% in November 2010. Hispanic adults, adults younger than age 65, college graduates and those living in households with incomes of at least $75,000 are most likely to own e-book readers. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to own these devices.
Meanwhile, tablet computers have not seen the same level of growth among U.S. adults in recent months. As of May 2011, 8% of adults report owning a tablet computer such as an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom. This represents just a 3 percentage-point increase in ownership since November 2010. Overall, the highest rates of tablet ownership are among Hispanic adults and those with household incomes of at least $75,000 annually. Read more…

New report: E-reader ownership doubles in six months, while tablet ownership grows more slowly

Twelve percent of U.S. adults own an e-book reader as of May 2011, according to our latest report, up from 6% in November 2010. Hispanic adults, adults younger than age 65, college graduates and those living in households with incomes of at least $75,000 are most likely to own e-book readers. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to own these devices.

Meanwhile, tablet computers have not seen the same level of growth among U.S. adults in recent months. As of May 2011, 8% of adults report owning a tablet computer such as an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom. This represents just a 3 percentage-point increase in ownership since November 2010. Overall, the highest rates of tablet ownership are among Hispanic adults and those with household incomes of at least $75,000 annually. Read more

How the Library of Congress is building the Twitter archive [and when it might be available to researchers]
by Audrey Watters, O’Reilly RadarJune 2, 2011

What makes the endeavor challenging, if not the size of the archive,  is its composition:  billions and billions and billions of tweets. When the donation was announced last year, users were creating about 50 million tweets per day. As of Twitter’s fifth anniversary several months ago, that number has increased to about 140 million  tweets per day.  The data keeps coming too, and the Library of Congress  has access to the Twitter stream via Gnip for both real-time and historical tweet data.
Each tweet is a JSON file, containing an immense amount of metadata in addition to the contents of the tweet itself:  date and time, number  of followers, account creation date, geodata, and so on.  To add  another layer of complexity, many tweets contain shortened URLs, and the  Library of Congress is in discussions with many of these providers as  well as with the Internet Archive and its 301works project to help resolve and map the links.
[…]
A pilot workshop is slated to run this summer with researchers who  can help guide the Library of Congress in building out the archive and  its accessibility.  Anderson and Johnston say they expect an initial  offering to be made available in four or five months. But even then,  access to the Twitter archive will be restricted to “known researchers”  who will need to go through the Library of Congress approval process to  gain access to the data.  Based on the sheer number of research  requests, there are going to be plenty of scholars lined up to have a closer examination of this important cultural and  technological archive.

Read more at radar.oreilly.com
Book Worms Consuming More
by Jack Loechner, MediaPostJune 2, 2011

Today’s e-book power buyer, someone who  buys an e-book at least once a week, is a 44-year-old woman who loves  romance and is spending more on buying books now than in the past. She  uses a dedicated e-reader like a Kindle instead of reading on her  computer.

Read more at mediapost.com

How the Library of Congress is building the Twitter archive [and when it might be available to researchers]

by Audrey Watters, O’Reilly Radar
June 2, 2011

What makes the endeavor challenging, if not the size of the archive, is its composition: billions and billions and billions of tweets. When the donation was announced last year, users were creating about 50 million tweets per day. As of Twitter’s fifth anniversary several months ago, that number has increased to about 140 million tweets per day. The data keeps coming too, and the Library of Congress has access to the Twitter stream via Gnip for both real-time and historical tweet data.

Each tweet is a JSON file, containing an immense amount of metadata in addition to the contents of the tweet itself: date and time, number of followers, account creation date, geodata, and so on. To add another layer of complexity, many tweets contain shortened URLs, and the Library of Congress is in discussions with many of these providers as well as with the Internet Archive and its 301works project to help resolve and map the links.

[…]

A pilot workshop is slated to run this summer with researchers who can help guide the Library of Congress in building out the archive and its accessibility. Anderson and Johnston say they expect an initial offering to be made available in four or five months. But even then, access to the Twitter archive will be restricted to “known researchers” who will need to go through the Library of Congress approval process to gain access to the data. Based on the sheer number of research requests, there are going to be plenty of scholars lined up to have a closer examination of this important cultural and technological archive.

Read more at radar.oreilly.com

Book Worms Consuming More

by Jack Loechner, MediaPost
June 2, 2011

Today’s e-book power buyer, someone who buys an e-book at least once a week, is a 44-year-old woman who loves romance and is spending more on buying books now than in the past. She uses a dedicated e-reader like a Kindle instead of reading on her computer.

Read more at mediapost.com

E-Book Report: Nook Is Up, IPad Still Catching Up
by Hillel Italie, Associated PressMay 26, 2011

As the publishing industry wrapped up four days of digital talk at its annual national convention, Amazon.com’s Kindle was seen as the clear, if not dominant, player in the growing e-market; Barnes & Noble’s Nook was considered a pleasant surprise and Apple’s iPad an underachiever.

E-Book Report: Nook Is Up, IPad Still Catching Up

by Hillel Italie, Associated Press
May 26, 2011

As the publishing industry wrapped up four days of digital talk at its annual national convention, Amazon.com’s Kindle was seen as the clear, if not dominant, player in the growing e-market; Barnes & Noble’s Nook was considered a pleasant surprise and Apple’s iPad an underachiever.

Tags: Links ebooks tech

Further Reading
Report: Americans and their gadgets (2010)
Report: Generations and their gadgets (2011) 
[Update] Trend charts: Gadget ownership (adults)

Further Reading

Generations and their gadgets
Many devices have become popular across generations, with a majority now owning cell phones, laptops and desktop computers. Younger adults  are leading the way in increased  mobility, preferring laptops to desktops and using their cell phones for a variety of functions, including internet, email, music, games, and video. This infographic shows the percentage of adults in each  generation who own each of the  gadgets we asked about in our September 2010 survey.
These findings are based on a survey of 3,001 American adults (ages 18 and older) conducted between August 9 and September 13, 2010. The margin of error is +/- 3 percentage points. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish, and the survey included 1,000 cell   phone interviews.
For more information, including gadget ownership trends over time, please see the main report, “Generations and their gadgets.”

Generations and their gadgets

Many devices have become popular across generations, with a majority now owning cell phones, laptops and desktop computers. Younger adults are leading the way in increased mobility, preferring laptops to desktops and using their cell phones for a variety of functions, including internet, email, music, games, and video. This infographic shows the percentage of adults in each generation who own each of the gadgets we asked about in our September 2010 survey.

These findings are based on a survey of 3,001 American adults (ages 18 and older) conducted between August 9 and September 13, 2010. The margin of error is +/- 3 percentage points. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish, and the survey included 1,000 cell phone interviews.

For more information, including gadget ownership trends over time, please see the main report, “Generations and their gadgets.”

Further Reading
Report: Generations and their gadgets (2011) 
Report: Americans and their gadgets (2010)

Further Reading