Even with e-reading on the rise, parents say print books are important for children.

If you have a child that you read to, do you prefer print or electronic?

Comparing e-book readers to book readers …

(via http://pewrsr.ch/ZDqqKD)

(Source: libraries.pewinternet.org)

Electronic reading: It’s what’s happening.
Did you get an e-reader/tablet for Hanukkah/Xmas? Our new stats show that there’s been a recent jump in e-book reading, while print reading is on the decline; and in all, the # of owners of either a tablet computer or e-book reading device such as a Kindle or Nook grew from 18% in late 2011 to 33% in late 2012.
The full report: http://pewrsr.ch/ZDqqKD

Electronic reading: It’s what’s happening.

Did you get an e-reader/tablet for Hanukkah/Xmas? Our new stats show that there’s been a recent jump in e-book reading, while print reading is on the decline; and in all, the # of owners of either a tablet computer or e-book reading device such as a Kindle or Nook grew from 18% in late 2011 to 33% in late 2012.

The full report: http://pewrsr.ch/ZDqqKD

Print vs. e-books showdown

In our recent report on the rise of e-reading, we asked people who read both print books and e-books in the past year which format they thought was better for a variety of situations. You tell us — If you’re a “dual-format reader,” when does print win out over e-books (and vice versa?) How have e-books changed your reading habits (if at all)?

For our next report studying the changing role of public libraries in the digital age, we’re supplementing our usual nationally representative phone surveys with non-scientific, non-representative online studies to draw out the deeper, richer stories behind the data. If you check out or download e-books from your local public library, please participate in the study and tell us about your experiences!

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/participate/survey/e-book-borrowers

Why people like to read:
26% of those who had read a book in the past 12 months said that what they enjoyed most was learning, gaining knowledge, and discovering information.
15% cited the pleasures of escaping reality, becoming immersed in another world, and the enjoyment they got from using their imaginations.
12% said they liked the entertainment value of reading, the drama of good stories, the suspense of watching a good plot unfold.
12% said they enjoyed relaxing while reading and having quiet time.
6% liked the variety of topics they could access via reading and how they could find books that particularly interested them.
4% said they enjoy finding spiritual enrichment through reading and expanding their worldview.
3% said they like being mentally challenged by books.
2% cited the physical properties of books – their feel and smell – as a primary pleasure.

Why people like to read:

  • 26% of those who had read a book in the past 12 months said that what they enjoyed most was learning, gaining knowledge, and discovering information.
  • 15% cited the pleasures of escaping reality, becoming immersed in another world, and the enjoyment they got from using their imaginations.
  • 12% said they liked the entertainment value of reading, the drama of good stories, the suspense of watching a good plot unfold.
  • 12% said they enjoyed relaxing while reading and having quiet time.
  • 6% liked the variety of topics they could access via reading and how they could find books that particularly interested them.
  • 4% said they enjoy finding spiritual enrichment through reading and expanding their worldview.
  • 3% said they like being mentally challenged by books.
  • 2% cited the physical properties of books – their feel and smell – as a primary pleasure.

The rise of e-reading: new report (on a new section of our site!)

One-fifth of American adults (21%) report that they have read an e-book in the past year. The rise of e-books in American culture is part of a larger story about a shift from printed to digital material. We’ve got it all in our new report out today

You’ll notice that the new report is living in a new space - as part of our multi-year study of the changing role of public libraries in the digital age, we felt it was important to give this work a room of its own. Please let us know what you think!

calimae:

thekindlemonologues:

calimae:

Popular e-Book Formats & Readers

Kindles also read .TXT and .Doc formats. Perhaps not super popular, but worth knowing.
And if you’re prepared to “tinker” with the Firmware? They’ll also read epubs. Granted not DRM protected epubs, but regular DRM free epubs? They work a charm.
[I’d also argue that the Kobo ecosystem being missing is strange, as I’m sure their marketshare is higher than that of Windows 7 / Phone.]

Some notes on the graphic I just posted (as a non-user of ereaders, I can’t speak to the accuracy of the graphic or the comments).

calimae:

thekindlemonologues:

calimae:

Popular e-Book Formats & Readers

Kindles also read .TXT and .Doc formats. Perhaps not super popular, but worth knowing.

And if you’re prepared to “tinker” with the Firmware? They’ll also read epubs. Granted not DRM protected epubs, but regular DRM free epubs? They work a charm.

[I’d also argue that the Kobo ecosystem being missing is strange, as I’m sure their marketshare is higher than that of Windows 7 / Phone.]

Some notes on the graphic I just posted (as a non-user of ereaders, I can’t speak to the accuracy of the graphic or the comments).

(Source: twitter.com, via appsandstacks)

"One of the most interesting things about this [digital] environment to me is that no one has yet come up with a playbook. Everybody’s trying to experiment in interesting ways; everybody’s trying to understand what the new media ecology looks like and how it can serve them. It’s a hard world to figure out."

—Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Internet Project, quoted in What do Americans want from their libraries? Here’s our chance to find out

For years researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project have been tracking changes in our information ecosystem. Now they’ll be looking at the habits and expectations of library users—and nonusers. [next libraries]

How to participate in our new study:

There are two ways to get involved in the Pew Internet Project’s research on American libraries.

  1. For the first phase of the study, which will begin in the next few months, Rainie will need to identify people who use ebook readers and tablets in libraries. Participants will be asked about their reading habits, how they use their ereaders with library materials, and what the experience is like for them. If you know of ebook-reading patrons who would be willing to participate, contact Rainie at lrainie [at] pewinternet [dot] org.
  2. For the second phase of the study, which will happen in mid- to late 2012, the Pew Internet Project will be surveying both librarians and community members about library services. Rainie wants to hear from a diverse set of librarians about services they’re now offering, services they’re contemplating, and services they may be seeing less demand for. If you’re a librarian who would like to participate, contact Rainie at lrainie [at] pewinternet [dot] org.

Amazon.com announces its Kindle Textbook rental program for students - msnbc.com

Tags: ebooks news tech

In a three-part series in the Boston Globe, Amanda Katz is looking at the past, present, and future of reading. Here, in the second part of the series, she asks: As e-book sales surge and those of paper peers struggle, how far will transition to digital go?

Related research: E-reader ownership doubles in six months (2011)

Tags: ebooks links

Further Reading
Report: E-reader ownership doubles in six months (2011)
[Update] Trend charts: Gadget ownership (adults)

Further Reading

kathrynzickuhr:

E-books in U.S. Public Libraries

Nationwide, 67% percent of public libraries report offering free access to e-books to library patrons - up 30 percent since 2007.

From the ALA’s Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2010-2011.

kathrynzickuhr:

E-books in U.S. Public Libraries

Nationwide, 67% percent of public libraries report offering free access to e-books to library patrons - up 30 percent since 2007.

From the ALA’s Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2010-2011.

(Source: Fast Company)