pewresearch:

explore-blog:

Virginia Woolf memorably wrote:

I ransack public libraries, and find them full of sunk treasure.

Here’s to the glorious geography of ransacking: A stride-stopping map of the distribution density of public libraries. 
Pair with these lovely vintage ads for libraries and this 1946 infographic on the state of public libraries. 

In addition, we have a treasure trove of data and research on America’s libraries — who uses them, what we use them for, and what the future of libraries might look like.

pewresearch:

explore-blog:

Virginia Woolf memorably wrote:

I ransack public libraries, and find them full of sunk treasure.

Here’s to the glorious geography of ransacking: A stride-stopping map of the distribution density of public libraries. 

Pair with these lovely vintage ads for libraries and this 1946 infographic on the state of public libraries

In addition, we have a treasure trove of data and research on America’s libraries — who uses them, what we use them for, and what the future of libraries might look like.

(Source: explore-blog)

pewresearch:

Featuring Pew Research data visualization in chart #12 and a cameo in #27.

And have a great weekend!

And have a great weekend!

(Source: ilovecharts)

Tags: charts

Fast Facts: Cell Phones
Mobile phones have become a near-ubiquitous tool for information seeking and communicating—83% of American adults have a cell phone of some kind. Though roughly nine in ten (92%) adults ages 18-49 own a cell phone,  ownership starts to drop off after age 50, with 82% of adults ages 50-64 and 55% of those 65 and older owning a mobile phone.
Text messaging and picture taking continue to top the list of ways that Americans use their mobile phones—three quarters of all cell owners (73%) use their phones for each of these purposes. Other relatively common activities include sending photos or videos to others (54% of cell owners do this) as well as accessing the internet (44%).
Among cell phone owners, 42% own a smartphone. That translates into 35% of all adults. Several demographic groups have high levels of smartphone adoption, including the financially well-off and well-educated, non-whites, and those under the age of 45.
Read more about:
Trends in Americans’ gadget ownership
How adults in the US use their cell phones
Smartphone ownership and use

Fast Facts: Cell Phones

Mobile phones have become a near-ubiquitous tool for information seeking and communicating—83% of American adults have a cell phone of some kind. Though roughly nine in ten (92%) adults ages 18-49 own a cell phone,  ownership starts to drop off after age 50, with 82% of adults ages 50-64 and 55% of those 65 and older owning a mobile phone.

Text messaging and picture taking continue to top the list of ways that Americans use their mobile phones—three quarters of all cell owners (73%) use their phones for each of these purposes. Other relatively common activities include sending photos or videos to others (54% of cell owners do this) as well as accessing the internet (44%).

Among cell phone owners, 42% own a smartphone. That translates into 35% of all adults. Several demographic groups have high levels of smartphone adoption, including the financially well-off and well-educated, non-whites, and those under the age of 45.

Read more about:


It’s official: Half of *all* American adults use social networking sites.
Fully 65% of adult internet users now say they use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn, up from 61% one year ago. This marks the first time in Pew Internet surveys that 50% of all adults use social networking sites.
The frequency of social networking site usage among young adult internet users under age 30 was stable over the last year – 61% of online Americans in that age cohort now use social networking sites on a typical day, compared with 60% one year ago. However, among the Boomer-aged segment of internet users ages 50-64, social networking site usage on a typical day grew a significant 60% (from 20% to 32%).
“The graying of social networking sites continues, but the oldest users are still far less likely to be making regular use of these tools,” said Mary Madden, Senior Research Specialist and co-author of the report. “While seniors are testing the waters, many Baby Boomers are beginning to make a trip to the social media pool part of their daily routine.”
Read or download the full report at http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Networking-Sites.aspx

It’s official: Half of *all* American adults use social networking sites.

Fully 65% of adult internet users now say they use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn, up from 61% one year ago. This marks the first time in Pew Internet surveys that 50% of all adults use social networking sites.

The frequency of social networking site usage among young adult internet users under age 30 was stable over the last year – 61% of online Americans in that age cohort now use social networking sites on a typical day, compared with 60% one year ago. However, among the Boomer-aged segment of internet users ages 50-64, social networking site usage on a typical day grew a significant 60% (from 20% to 32%).

“The graying of social networking sites continues, but the oldest users are still far less likely to be making regular use of these tools,” said Mary Madden, Senior Research Specialist and co-author of the report. “While seniors are testing the waters, many Baby Boomers are beginning to make a trip to the social media pool part of their daily routine.”

Read or download the full report at http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Networking-Sites.aspx

As the internet has increasingly gone mobile,  laptop computers have grown in popularity. Since 2006, the proportion  of Americans who own a desktop computer has fallen slightly from 68% to  59%, while the proportion with a laptop computer has increased  dramatically—from 30% in April 2006 to 52% in September 2010.
18-29 year olds are currently the only major demographic group for whom  laptops are notably more commonplace than desktop computers. Nearly  three-quarters of 18-29 year olds (72%) own a laptop computer, compared  with 56% who have a desktop computer.

As the internet has increasingly gone mobile, laptop computers have grown in popularity. Since 2006, the proportion of Americans who own a desktop computer has fallen slightly from 68% to 59%, while the proportion with a laptop computer has increased dramatically—from 30% in April 2006 to 52% in September 2010.

18-29 year olds are currently the only major demographic group for whom laptops are notably more commonplace than desktop computers. Nearly three-quarters of 18-29 year olds (72%) own a laptop computer, compared with 56% who have a desktop computer.

New report: 13% of online adults use Twitter
13% of online adults use the status update service Twitter, which represents a significant increase from the 8% of online adults who identified themselves as Twitter users in November 2010. 95% of Twitter users own a mobile phone, and half of these users access the service on their handheld device.
As in our previous research on Twitter use, African Americans and Latinos continue to have high rates of adoption of the service. Fully 25% of online African Americans use Twitter at least occasionally, with 11% doing so on a typical day.
Additionally, Twitter use by internet users ages 25-34 has doubled since late 2010 (from 9% to 19%) and usage by those ages 35-44 has also grown significantly (from 8% to 14%). Read more…

New report: 13% of online adults use Twitter

13% of online adults use the status update service Twitter, which represents a significant increase from the 8% of online adults who identified themselves as Twitter users in November 2010. 95% of Twitter users own a mobile phone, and half of these users access the service on their handheld device.

As in our previous research on Twitter use, African Americans and Latinos continue to have high rates of adoption of the service. Fully 25% of online African Americans use Twitter at least occasionally, with 11% doing so on a typical day.

Additionally, Twitter use by internet users ages 25-34 has doubled since late 2010 (from 9% to 19%) and usage by those ages 35-44 has also grown significantly (from 8% to 14%). Read more