A great report out yesterday from the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press found that cable leads the pack as the campaign news source, and Facebook and Twitter play only modest roles. Fewer Americans are closely following news about the presidential campaign than four years ago.

Also of note: 68% say they prefer to get political news from sources that do not have a political point of view, compared with just 23% who prefer news from sources that share their point of view. (via)

pewresearch:

Many Voters Unaware of Basic Facts About GOP Candidates

pewresearch:

Many Voters Unaware of Basic Facts About GOP Candidates

Internet activism has always been a medium of inclusiveness — Twitter and YouTube rather than either/or. And this time around, there will be even more new technologies no presidential candidate has used before, such as canvassing apps for the iPhone and iPad, or location-targeting technologies for field organizers.

At the same time, classic sites like Facebook and Google have new features that could change the 2012 dynamic in unpredictable ways.

“For even the most traditional kinds of actors to be nimble in these spaces, it’s mostly going to depend on their willingness to exploit these new tools and their interest in going into places where all the outcomes aren’t necessarily well understood,” says Lee Rainie, who directs the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life project.

Pew research shows that, aided by the Tea Party’s enthusiasm, Republicans caught up to Democrats in their use of new media during the 2010 midterm elections.

Further Reading: