We are conducting our new survey about the future of the internet now and we’d love you to participate as a respondent. You can take the survey here.
The survey is similar in format to our previous work. We ask experts and avid followers of the internet to answer questions about alternative scenarios for the way technology will evolve and affect people over the next decade. After you’ve chosen a scenario, we hope you’ll explain your answer more elaborately by completing a narrative portion of the survey.
In all, we hope the survey will take 15-20 minutes to complete. And we hope you’ll like it enough to recommend it to your friends!
Want more? You can also read through previous “Future of the internet” reports on our website and at imaginingtheinternet.org.

We are conducting our new survey about the future of the internet now and we’d love you to participate as a respondent. You can take the survey here.

The survey is similar in format to our previous work. We ask experts and avid followers of the internet to answer questions about alternative scenarios for the way technology will evolve and affect people over the next decade. After you’ve chosen a scenario, we hope you’ll explain your answer more elaborately by completing a narrative portion of the survey.

In all, we hope the survey will take 15-20 minutes to complete. And we hope you’ll like it enough to recommend it to your friends!

Want more? You can also read through previous “Future of the internet” reports on our website and at imaginingtheinternet.org.

(Source: elon.edu)

As the internet has increasingly gone mobile,  laptop computers have grown in popularity. Since 2006, the proportion  of Americans who own a desktop computer has fallen slightly from 68% to  59%, while the proportion with a laptop computer has increased  dramatically—from 30% in April 2006 to 52% in September 2010.
18-29 year olds are currently the only major demographic group for whom  laptops are notably more commonplace than desktop computers. Nearly  three-quarters of 18-29 year olds (72%) own a laptop computer, compared  with 56% who have a desktop computer.

As the internet has increasingly gone mobile, laptop computers have grown in popularity. Since 2006, the proportion of Americans who own a desktop computer has fallen slightly from 68% to 59%, while the proportion with a laptop computer has increased dramatically—from 30% in April 2006 to 52% in September 2010.

18-29 year olds are currently the only major demographic group for whom laptops are notably more commonplace than desktop computers. Nearly three-quarters of 18-29 year olds (72%) own a laptop computer, compared with 56% who have a desktop computer.

New research from Eszter Hargittai and Eden Litt uses longitudinal data to explore race, celebrity, and why young adults use Twitter. The abstract:

What motivates young adults to start using the popular microblogging site Twitter? Can we identify any systematic patterns of adoption or is use of the service randomly distributed among Internet users of this demographic? Drawing on unique longitudinal data surveying 505 diverse young American adults about their Internet uses at two points in time (2009, 2010), this paper looks at what explains the uptake of Twitter during the year when the site saw considerable increase in use. We find that African Americans are more likely to use the service, as are those with higher Internet skills. Results also suggest that interest in celebrity and entertainment news is a significant predictor of Twitter use mediating the effect of race. In contrast, interest in local and national news, international news, and politics shows no relationship to Twitter adoption in this population segment.

Source: Reputation Management and Social Media, by Mary Madden and Aaron Smith (2010), based on Pew Internet September 2009 survey

The Rise of Networked Individuals: The Millennial Tide

The online world is as varied as people are varied in their moral views, their economic circumstances and their social structures. In the video above, Director Lee Rainie discusses social, economic, and political trends especially among the younger generation that have given rise to a new and emerging class of networked citizens at Google’s Mountain View, CA headquarters.

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