25% of teens use cell phones to get online. Among adults it’s 15%.
Full graphic
Full report

25% of teens use cell phones to get online. Among adults it’s 15%.

Full graphic

Full report

TEENS HAVE GONE MOBILE.
Check these stats:
78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all teens who have smartphones, up from just 23% in 2011.
23% of teens have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population.
95% of teens use the internet.
93% of teens have a computer or have access to one at home.
AND - 1 in 4 teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.
More: http://pewrsr.ch/ZmwgLG

TEENS HAVE GONE MOBILE.

Check these stats:

  • 78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all teens who have smartphones, up from just 23% in 2011.
  • 23% of teens have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population.
  • 95% of teens use the internet.
  • 93% of teens have a computer or have access to one at home.

AND - 1 in 4 teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.

More: http://pewrsr.ch/ZmwgLG

Girl: “If my parents saw what I did on Facebook, it would be the end of me.”

Guy: “Yeah.”

Girl: “OMG you should totally do what Marci did!” 

Guy: “Oh Marci, what did Marci do?”

Girl: “She had this Facebook page with like 8 friends, and that’s the one her mom was friends with, and then she had the Facebook page with 800 friends, and her mom didn’t even know about that one.”

Among parents who have a child between the ages of 12 and 17, 66% say they use a social networking site, up from 58% in 2011 (http://pewrsr.ch/SbScGX). Is your parent’s Facebook page an issue for you?

(Source: youtube.com)

“Overall, what would you say is the most NEGATIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?”

“Overall, what would you say is the most NEGATIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?”

(Source: pewinternet.org)

The perceived impact of the internet on student research, in a word:
“Overall, what would you say is the most POSITIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?
A survey of Advanced Placement & National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age. They say the internet & digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research work, but are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans”. Check out the full, detailed report, out today: http://pewrsr.ch/Ujc6yh

The perceived impact of the internet on student research, in a word:

Overall, what would you say is the most POSITIVE aspect of students today being able to conduct research online?

A survey of Advanced Placement & National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age. They say the internet & digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research work, but are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans”. Check out the full, detailed report, out today: http://pewrsr.ch/Ujc6yh

(Source: pewinternet.org)

"We have also learned from our focus groups that some youth feel pressure to add people to their social media network, and as a result, it becomes almost a reproduction of their school. They feel like it is mean to not friend someone so they will accept any request even if they only know the person vaguely. So it is important to remember that some youth have created networks that are not that private at all. Plus, for many youth, they know how to use social media sites to interact and connect with others, but they don’t always “look under the hood” and may not have a nuanced understanding of how the privacy settings really work."

The Digital Media and Learning Research Hub has a great Q&A with our teens expert Amanda Lenhart on some of the hot topics related to youth, social networking and web 2.0.

Read the full Q&A

New report out today: Teens & Online Video

When we asked teens about a number of online behaviors in our July 2011 Teens and Online Behavior survey, we found that when it comes to video:

  • 37% of internet users ages 12-17 participate in video chats with others using applications such as Skype, Googletalk or iChat. Girls are more likely than boys to have such chats.
  • 27% of internet-using teens 12-17 record and upload video to the internet. One major difference between now and 2006 is that online girls are just as likely these days to upload video as online boys.
  • 13% of internet-using teens stream video live to the internet for other people to watch.
  • Social media users are much more likely than those who do not use social media to engage in all three video behaviors studied.

Read the full report

Tags: teens video

Fast facts: Teens and and the internet/technology

As of July 2011:

  • Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are online.
  • 77% of teens have a cell phone.
  • 23% of teens have a smartphone; 54% have a regular cell phone (or are not sure what kind of phone they have), and another 23% of teens do not have a cell phone at all.
  • 74% own a desktop or laptop computer.
  • Texting dominates teens’ general communication choices. Overall, 75% of all teens text, and 63% say that they use text to communicate with others every day.
  • The volume of texting among teens has risen from a median 50 texts a day in 2009 to 60 texts for the typical teen text user.
  • 80% of online teens use social network sites such as Facebook or MySpace, and 16% use Twitter. 
  • 69% of social media-using teens say their experience is that peers are mostly kind to each other in social network spaces. Another 20% say their peers are mostly unkind, while 11% volunteered that “it depends.”
  • 8% of social media-using teens have witnessed other people be mean or cruel on social network sites.
  • 44% of online teens admit to lying about their age at one time or another so they could access a website or sign up for an online account.

Read more

Chart of the week: Number of text messages sent/received per day by different groups of teens
The median number of texts (i.e. the midpoint user in our sample) sent on a typical day by teens ages 12-17 rose from 50 in 2009 to 60 in 2011. Girls ages 14-17 send/receive a median of 100 texts a day, compared with 50 for boys the same age.
Read more …

Chart of the week: Number of text messages sent/received per day by different groups of teens

The median number of texts (i.e. the midpoint user in our sample) sent on a typical day by teens ages 12-17 rose from 50 in 2009 to 60 in 2011. Girls ages 14-17 send/receive a median of 100 texts a day, compared with 50 for boys the same age.

Read more

New report: Teens, Smartphones & Texting

Texting dominates teens’ general communication choices, and 23% of teens own a smartphone.  The volume of texting among teens has risen from 50 texts a day in 2009 to 60 texts for the median teen text user. Among teen communication choices:

  • 63% say that they use text to communicate with others every day.
  • 39% of teens make and receive voice calls on their mobile phones every day.
  • 35% of all teens socialize with others in person outside of school on a daily basis.
  • 29% of all teens exchange messages daily through social network sites.
  • 22% of teens use instant messaging daily to talk to others.
  • 19% of teens talk on landlines with people in their lives daily.
  • 6% of teens exchange email daily.
Our new report explores the tools teens use to communicate, with a particular focus on mobile devices, and then places the use of those tools in the broader context of how teens choose to communicate with people in their lives. Read more

Analysts generally believe many young people growing up in today’s networked world and counting on the internet as their external brain will be nimble analysts and decision-makers who will do well. But these experts also expect that constantly connected teens and young adults will thirst for instant gratification and often make quick, shallow choices. Where will that leave us in 2020?

We’ve got a new report out today with expert predictions about the future of the internet.

Read the full report

16% of 12-17 year-olds said they used Twitter in our survey last July. Two years earlier, that percentage was just 8 (see http://pewrsr.ch/vWuMHJ).

It used to be pins, then letterman jackets, and jewelry; now, according to The New York Times, it’s passwords.

Our recent report on Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites found that one in three online teens has shared a password with a friend or significant other. You can read the full report here.

poptentlabs:

An interesting segment with Pew Senior Researcher Mary Madden on teenage behavior in regards to privacy, but one thing really caught my attention. Madden at around 1:46,

But they also have a variety of ways to customize and cloak their messaging on social media. Teens use private messaging channels, they use slang, they use jokes that may only be understood by peers. So just because someone is posting something broadly to a network it may not actually be intended for everyone in the network.

In case you missed it, be sure to check out Mary Madden’s discussion of teens, privacy, and social network sites with Brooke Gladstone in last week’s On the Media here.

PS: The findings Mary discussed are from a larger report about teens’ positive and negative experiences on social media; the full report is available (for free!) on our website.