Another lovely infographic for your Friday morning…
We just noticed that the folks at Visible Technologies have pulled some stats from our recent report on mobile and social location-based services, particularly the section about social media users who have set up their accounts to automatically include their location in their posts. (Click here for a larger version.)
Highlights from the mobile findings:
12% of smartphone owners have used a geosocial (“check in”) service such as Foursquare or Gowalla.
55% of smartphone owners have used a location-based  information service to get directions or recommendations based on their  current location.
And the social:
14% of social media users have set up their account to automatically include their location in their posts.
Want more data? Read more in the full report on our website.

Another lovely infographic for your Friday morning…

We just noticed that the folks at Visible Technologies have pulled some stats from our recent report on mobile and social location-based services, particularly the section about social media users who have set up their accounts to automatically include their location in their posts. (Click here for a larger version.)

Highlights from the mobile findings:

  • 12% of smartphone owners have used a geosocial (“check in”) service such as Foursquare or Gowalla.
  • 55% of smartphone owners have used a location-based information service to get directions or recommendations based on their current location.

And the social:

  • 14% of social media users have set up their account to automatically include their location in their posts.

Want more data? Read more in the full report on our website.

(Source: cmswire.com)

What we’re reading: A new report on awareness, attitudes, and use of online parental controls from the Family Online Safety Institute
Among the main findings:
Parents generally feel their children are safe online, but confidence declines the older the child and the more time he or she spends online.
When it comes to various online activities, parents express the most concern about their children viewing sexually explicit content online—70% say they are very/somewhat concerned. Other top concerns include communicating with a stranger online (61%) and visiting Web sites with inappropriate content (61%).
Fully 96% of parents surveyed say they have had a conversation with their child about what to do and not to do online.
Top concerns about children’s online safety relate to personal safety online, and significant concern also is expressed about spam and their child spending too much time online.
53% of parents say they have used parental control technologies to assist them in monitoring their child’s Internet usage.
Read more at FOSI.org
The research consisted of a nationwide telephone survey among 702 parents of children ages eight to 17 who access the Internet, and was conducted by Hart Research Associates. Interviewing was conducted from July 8 to 16, 2011, with a margin of error of ±3.7 percentage points.
(Click here for a full version of the above infographic - PDF)

What we’re reading: A new report on awareness, attitudes, and use of online parental controls from the Family Online Safety Institute

Among the main findings:

  • Parents generally feel their children are safe online, but confidence declines the older the child and the more time he or she spends online.
  • When it comes to various online activities, parents express the most concern about their children viewing sexually explicit content online—70% say they are very/somewhat concerned. Other top concerns include communicating with a stranger online (61%) and visiting Web sites with inappropriate content (61%).
  • Fully 96% of parents surveyed say they have had a conversation with their child about what to do and not to do online.
  • Top concerns about children’s online safety relate to personal safety online, and significant concern also is expressed about spam and their child spending too much time online.
  • 53% of parents say they have used parental control technologies to assist them in monitoring their child’s Internet usage.

Read more at FOSI.org

The research consisted of a nationwide telephone survey among 702 parents of children ages eight to 17 who access the Internet, and was conducted by Hart Research Associates. Interviewing was conducted from July 8 to 16, 2011, with a margin of error of ±3.7 percentage points.

(Click here for a full version of the above infographic - PDF)

good:

We just released all of our most recent magazine’s content up on our site. GOOD 024: The Data Issue is our look at the world of data, and the ways in which it influences—both negatively and positively—our lives. 
Click through to see all of the amazing stories. And, if you haven’t yet, be sure to pick up a copy, since it really is so nice to hold in your hands and flip through. 

good:

We just released all of our most recent magazine’s content up on our site. GOOD 024: The Data Issue is our look at the world of data, and the ways in which it influences—both negatively and positively—our lives. 

Click through to see all of the amazing stories. And, if you haven’t yet, be sure to pick up a copy, since it really is so nice to hold in your hands and flip through. 

Our new report covers online learning in higher ed, but there’s another report out today with data about K-12 online learners: Click here to download the PDF.

What we’re reading: Twitter Users Blast the London Rioters
A special computational analysis from our sister project PEJ (@PEJPew) found that Twitter users overwhelmingly focused on the London riots last week, with many highly angered by and critical of the chaos. While much of the mainstream news coverage explored the causes of the riots, social media users were much more intent on denouncing the destruction. Read more…

What we’re reading: Twitter Users Blast the London Rioters

A special computational analysis from our sister project PEJ (@PEJPew) found that Twitter users overwhelmingly focused on the London riots last week, with many highly angered by and critical of the chaos. While much of the mainstream news coverage explored the causes of the riots, social media users were much more intent on denouncing the destruction. Read more

emergentfutures:

comScore has released results of a study on mobile QR and bar code scanning based on data from its comScore MobiLens service. A QR (“Quick Response”) code is a specific matrix bar code (or two-dimensional code) that is readable by smartphones. The study found that in June 2011, 14 million mobile users in the U.S., representing 6.2 percent of the total mobile audience, scanned a QR or bar code on their mobile device

Our latest report includes the finding that, in the month prior to taking our survey, 13% of cell phone owners had pretended to be using their phone in order to avoid interacting with the people around them. And The Atlantic is asking you to help give this practice a name:

 If you’re of a certain age and position relative to a metro area, you have almost undoubtedly engaged in this practice. And now that Pew has identified it as a national-level behavior, we need to name it. Sarah Rich suggests “dodge dialing.” Derek Thompson coined “the cell phone side step.” And Becca Rosen likes “phaking.” You got a better name? Something’s gotta catch on.

This report represents the first research into congressional staffers’ attitudes about their offices’ use of social media. The findings are based on an online survey of congressional staff on their opinions and practices related to constituent communications, including social media. The findings are based on a survey of congressional staff which was conducted between October 12 and December 13, 2010. The survey had 260 respondents.

More: Read through the key findings or download the PDF.

In a three-part series in the Boston Globe, Amanda Katz is looking at the past, present, and future of reading. Here, in the second part of the series, she asks: As e-book sales surge and those of paper peers struggle, how far will transition to digital go?

Related research: E-reader ownership doubles in six months (2011)

Tags: ebooks links

Fred Trotter on how the “Programmable Self” can be applied to healthier living

Q: So how would you explain the “Programmable Self” to my mother?

Fred Trotter: The basic idea is that I’m going to make a contract with myself to change, and software will manage that contract. There’s things that software can do, but it’s a very limited palette. You can have software embarrass you by posting something to Facebook. You can have software encourage you or praise you by posting something to Twitter. You can have software take your money, or software can give you money. By focusing on software’s motivational components, you can try to program yourself.   

analyticisms:

Very nice infographic by and about LinkedIn usage and demographics.  Very interesting data for B2B marketers.

analyticisms:

Very nice infographic by and about LinkedIn usage and demographics.  Very interesting data for B2B marketers.

A paper published today in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking examines how cell phones help and hurt teen/parent relationships. Read the full paper, “No Crossed Wires: Cell Phone Communications in Parent-Adolescent Relationships" (pdf), or a summary from the New York Times at the link above.

Further reading at pewinternet.org:

"Barnes & Noble Inc. said Thursday it will give $315 in e-books to customers who buy a Nook electronic reader in the bookseller’s stores — as long as they show them that they have another e-reader and want to make a switch."

Tags: ebooks news links