"The most significant impacts of the Internet on people’s lives by 2025 will involve augmented reality applications. Augmented reality tools such as AR mobile browsers (like Layar) or wearables (like Google Glass) will become affordable and widespread, and we will grow accustomed to seeing the world through multiple data layers. This will change a lot of social practices, such as dating, job interviewing and professional networking, and gaming, as well as policing and espionage."

Daren C. Brabham, assistant professor at the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, University of Southern California, on what digital life will be like in 2025.

Today, Google Glass is being made available to the public.

"The odds are 50/50 that the Internet will be effectively destroyed by cyberattacks by 2025. If the Net goes down, there will be terrible costs as we reboot the economy."

Robert E. McGrath, a retired software engineer who participated in critical developments of the World Wide Web, on the future of the internet. Survey participants in our future of the internet canvassing acknowledged the fact that global dependence on one particular system makes it a prime target for a devastating attack.

Agree? Disagree? Your thoughts?

"The Internet will be everywhere by 2025 — the question is, who will control it, and for what end?"

Anonymous responder, on the future of the internet.

Something to ponder …

"By 2025, it will become more apparent that personal digital devices have become the uncredited third lobe of our brain, and network connections more like an extension of our own nervous system, a new sense, like seeing and hearing. Questions about our rights over our own devices and connections will treat them more like parts of our bodies and beings than some third-party thing that is a privilege to own or something we merely rent. It will force us to redefine what being human means — and what personhood means, in terms of the law, representative government, and every other issue."

— Brian Behlendorf, Internet pioneer and board member of several non-profits and for-profits, predicted that people will feel the information network has become a “new sense” by 2025.

"Access to the Internet will be a international human right. The diversity of perspectives from all different parts of the globe tackling some of our biggest problems will lead to breakthroughs we can’t imagine on issues such as poverty, inequality, and the environment."

— Tiffany Shlain, creator of the AOL series The Future Starts Here, and founder of The Webby Awards, on what digital life will be like in 2025.

YOUR TURN: What are your predictions for the future of the internet?

We asked 2,558 experts and technology builders about what digital life will look like in 2025. They predict the Internet will become ‘like electricity’ — less visible, yet more deeply embedded in people’s lives for good and ill.

TELL US: What are your own predictions for the future of the internet?

The share of Americans who have a basic cellular phone that is not a smartphone has dropped 33 percentage points since 2005. Sign off if you still have one …

The share of Americans who have a basic cellular phone that is not a smartphone has dropped 33 percentage points since 2005. Sign off if you still have one …

"In the next few years we’ll see an explosion of touchscreens invading every part of our lives; from the bathroom mirror, to the touchscreen table and even the possibility to interact with your living-room touch window."

The Future of Communication? Let’s Ask the Experts (via futuristgerd)

See also: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Future-of-Smart-Systems.aspx

And http://pewinternet.org/topics/Future-of-the-internet.aspx

(via futuristgerd)

Bricks and clicks: The Internet and higher education in 2020
In the Pew Internet/Elon University survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers and users, 60% agreed with a statement that by 2020 “there will be mass adoption of teleconferencing and distance learning to leverage expert resources … a transition to ‘hybrid’ classes that combine online learning components with less-frequent on-campus, in-person class meetings.” Some 39% agreed with an opposing statement that said, “in 2020 higher education will not be much different from the way it is today.”
What do you think? What will universities look like in 2020?

Bricks and clicks: The Internet and higher education in 2020

In the Pew Internet/Elon University survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers and users, 60% agreed with a statement that by 2020 “there will be mass adoption of teleconferencing and distance learning to leverage expert resources … a transition to ‘hybrid’ classes that combine online learning components with less-frequent on-campus, in-person class meetings.” Some 39% agreed with an opposing statement that said, “in 2020 higher education will not be much different from the way it is today.”

What do you think? What will universities look like in 2020?

Jeff Jarvis’s 9 principles for discussion on the perfect internet

I.     We have the right to connect. If we cannot connect, we cannot speak. That is a new and necessary preamble to our First Amendment. Finland has declared Internet access—high-speed at that—as a right of citizens. Whether countries should subsidize and provide access is a separate question. But once access is established, cutting it off should be seen as a violation of human rights. ‘It’s now a basic human right to have Internet,’ Thomson Reuters CEO Tom Glocer told media executives in the Middle East. ‘Systematic denial of freedom of accessing information will lead to a revolution.’

II.   We have the right to speak. Freedom of speech is our cultural and legal default in the United States. That First Amendment protection should extend not just to information and opinions delivered by text but also to information delivered by applications and data. Yes, there need to be limitations—on child pornography online, for example. But beware the unintended consequences of attacking a specific problem with an overly broad response.

III. We have the right to assemble and to act. It is not enough to speak. Our tools of publicness enable us to organize, to gather together—virtually or physically—and to act as a group to demonstrate or to build.

IV. Privacy is an ethic of knowing someone else’s information and what you do with it. We need protection of privacy.

V.   Publicness is an ethic of sharing and deciding whether information you hold could be helpful to others. The foundation of a more public society is the principle of sharing: recognizing the benefits of generosity, building tools that facilitate it, and protecting the product of it.

VI.  Our institutions’ information should be public by default, secret by necessity. Openness is a better way to govern and a smarter way to do business.

VII.     What is public is a public good. When public information or the public space is diminished, the public loses. Secrecy too often serves the corrupt and tyrannical.

VIII.   All bits are created equal. When anyone gains the power to decide which bits, words, images, or ideas can or cannot pass freely through our network, it is no longer free.

IX. The Internet must stay open and distributed.  [And to quote another:] ‘Let’s give credit to the people who foresaw the Internet, opened it up, designed it so it would not have significant choke points, and made it possible for random people, including 24-year-olds in a dorm, to enter and create,’ says Eric Schmidt.”

Read more

(Source: pewinternet.org)

Corporate responsibility: How far will tech firms go in helping repressive regimes?
Experts are divided about the role Western technology companies will play in helping monitor and thwart dissident activity in the future. Some hope the open Internet and the prospect of consumer backlash will minimize businesses’ cooperation with authoritarian governments; others believe the urge for profits and for global reach across all cultures will compel firms to allow their digital tools to be used against critics of the status quo.
Read more of experts’ thoughts on the future of corporate of behavior in our new report, just out: The Future of Corporate Responsibility

Corporate responsibility: How far will tech firms go in helping repressive regimes?

Experts are divided about the role Western technology companies will play in helping monitor and thwart dissident activity in the future. Some hope the open Internet and the prospect of consumer backlash will minimize businesses’ cooperation with authoritarian governments; others believe the urge for profits and for global reach across all cultures will compel firms to allow their digital tools to be used against critics of the status quo.

Read more of experts’ thoughts on the future of corporate of behavior in our new report, just out: The Future of Corporate Responsibility

"… no one likes being outsmarted by their thermostat."

— David Weinberger, a senior researcher at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, in our new report on the future of smart systems. 

(Source: pewinternet.org)

"I still want my jetpack, by the way. I was promised a jetpack 50 years ago."

— danah boyd, on Homes of the Future in our new report out today: The Future of Smart Systems

(Source: pewinternet.org)

"Memories are becoming hyperlinks to information triggered by keywords and URLs. We are becoming ‘persistent paleontologists’ of our own external memories, as our brains are storing the keywords to get back to those memories and not the full memories themselves."

Amber Case, cyberanthropologist and CEO of Geoloqi, in our report on the future of millennials’ hyperconnected lives.

New report out today: The Future of Gamification
Game mechanics like rewards and feedback loops are gaining ground in digital life and many experts think they will spread widely to key domains like education and health by 2020. Others worry about a darker side …
Some thoughts:
Those who see gamification advancing note that fun is compelling; some project a merger of play + labor (“playbor”), work + leisure (“weisure”)
Game elements enhance and grow social networks, increase participation, and speed up self-organized learning. Simulations are especially compelling
Some are concerned about making everything a competition. Others note compelling game design can lead to exploitable information disclosures
People in interactive networks can be manipulated, and this is dangerous; could gamification lead to a Hunger Games world?

New report out today: The Future of Gamification

Game mechanics like rewards and feedback loops are gaining ground in digital life and many experts think they will spread widely to key domains like education and health by 2020. Others worry about a darker side …

Some thoughts:

Those who see gamification advancing note that fun is compelling; some project a merger of play + labor (“playbor”), work + leisure (“weisure”)

Game elements enhance and grow social networks, increase participation, and speed up self-organized learning. Simulations are especially compelling

Some are concerned about making everything a competition. Others note compelling game design can lead to exploitable information disclosures

People in interactive networks can be manipulated, and this is dangerous; could gamification lead to a Hunger Games world?