We’ve just updated our social networking fact sheet with some 2014 numbers; good time for a reminder that we’ve got a series of fast-fact tip sheets at your disposal for grab ‘n go tech stats: http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/

Plus, handy dandy charts of key tech indicators and their growth over time: http://www.pewinternet.org/three-technology-revolutions/

We’ve got the data, yes we do.

Happy 1st birthday to Fact Tank, Pew Research’s data blog.

Do you know all the facts?!?! To see how much you know about the facts shaping our world, take this quiz, drawn from the 900 or so posts from Fact Tank over the year.

Tags: facts data

futurescope:

A Vision of the Future From Those Likely to Invent It
Entertaining read from The Upshot. Insights via Marc Andreessen, Reid Hoffman, Clara Shih, Peter Thiel, Sebastian Thrun, Ev Williams and Susan Wojcick.

From employment to leisure and transportation to education, tech is changing the world at a faster pace than ever before. Already, people wear computers on their faces, robots scurry through factories and battlefields and driverless cars dot the highway that cuts through Silicon Valley. Almost two-thirds of Americans think technological change will lead to a better future, while about one-third think people’s lives will be worse as a result, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center. Regardless, expect more change. In a series of interviews, which have been condensed and edited, seven people who are driving this transformation provided a glimpse into the not-too-distant future.


33% of Americans expect to live in a world in which humans have long-term colonies on other planets.  More on U.S. views of the future of technology: http://pewrsr.ch/P0LBlm

futurescope:

A Vision of the Future From Those Likely to Invent It

Entertaining read from The Upshot. Insights via Marc Andreessen, Reid Hoffman, Clara Shih, Peter Thiel, Sebastian Thrun, Ev Williams and Susan Wojcick.

From employment to leisure and transportation to education, tech is changing the world at a faster pace than ever before. Already, people wear computers on their faces, robots scurry through factories and battlefields and driverless cars dot the highway that cuts through Silicon Valley. Almost two-thirds of Americans think technological change will lead to a better future, while about one-third think people’s lives will be worse as a result, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center. Regardless, expect more change. In a series of interviews, which have been condensed and edited, seven people who are driving this transformation provided a glimpse into the not-too-distant future.

33% of Americans expect to live in a world in which humans have long-term colonies on other planets.  More on U.S. views of the future of technology: http://pewrsr.ch/P0LBlm

ATTN data geeks and co.: We just posted the raw data from our survey conducted for the 25th anniversary of the Web, and our survey on e-reading and gadgets. Dig in.

Tags: web25 data

Have you ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet? We’ve taken a picture of it for you.
By analyzing many thousands of Twitter conversations, we identified 6 different Twitter conversational archetypes. How are these networks forming? Which crowd do you run with? Take a look at our NEW REPORT on mapping Twitter conversations: http://pewrsr.ch/1oWq6Am

Have you ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet? We’ve taken a picture of it for you.

By analyzing many thousands of Twitter conversations, we identified 6 different Twitter conversational archetypes. How are these networks forming? Which crowd do you run with? Take a look at our NEW REPORT on mapping Twitter conversations: http://pewrsr.ch/1oWq6Am

Three Technology Revolutions: Broadband, mobile, and social

Three major technology revolutions have occurred during the period the Pew Research Center has been studying digital technology – and yet more are on the horizon.

One of our favorite parts of our new website is our key indicators section, where we provide you with frequently updated, fast stats on our top hit internet/tech topics. Snack away: http://pewrsr.ch/1m8eStP

Data for breakfast: As of September 2013, 86% of American adults use the internet.
Good morning!

Data for breakfast: As of September 2013, 86% of American adults use the internet.

Good morning!

  1. Just over half (51%) of the public now favors same-sex marriage, while 42% are opposed.
  2. A majority of Americans (52%) now favor legalizing the use of marijuana.
  3. A majority agrees the U.S. should mind its own business internationally, the highest measure in nearly a half century of polling.
  4. The share of Americans saying they do not want their own representative in Congress reelected – 38% – is at its highest point in two decades.
  5. For the first time, a majority of the public (53%) says that the federal government threatens their personal rights and freedoms.
  6. 36% of the nation’s young adults ages 18 to 31—the so-called Millennial generation— now live in their parents’ home, the highest share in at least four decades.
  7. A record 40% of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income for the family.
  8. The U.S., which has a total population of 317 million, is now home to a record 40.4 million immigrants.
  9. A record seven-in-ten (69%) Hispanic high school graduates in the class of 2012 enrolled in college that fall, two percentage points higher than the rate (67%) among their white counterparts.
  10. The percentage of Americans who say the U.S. plays a more important and powerful role as a world leader than it did 10 years ago has fallen to a 40-year low of just 17%.
  11. The percentage of American Catholics calling themselves “strong” Catholics is at a four-decade low.
  12. For the first time since Pew Research Center began tracking smartphone adoption, a majority of Americans now own a smartphone of some kind.
  13. 50% of the public now cites the internet as a main source for national and international news.

The Who, What, Where, When & Why of Health Care Social Media: Health/tech expert Susannah Fox discussing the intersection of internet/tech/social media + health.

Tags: data

pewresearch:

Even at a time of fragmenting media use, television remains the dominant way that Americans get news at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Nielsen data. And while the largest audiences tune into local and network broadcast news, it is national cable news that commands the most attention from its viewers.

pewresearch:

Even at a time of fragmenting media use, television remains the dominant way that Americans get news at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Nielsen data. And while the largest audiences tune into local and network broadcast news, it is national cable news that commands the most attention from its viewers.

Tags: news tv data

Here’s an online video about … online videos.

If you can’t handle the  meta-ness, check out our BRAND NEW report on the rise of online video (31% of American adults are uploading them now, up from 14% in 2009). http://pewrsr.ch/1gt5BqI

Raw data from our latest teens survey posted on our website. Have at it.

Fun with charts: We’ve added a data-heavy appendix to our latest report on libaries + the digital age, which includes generational breakdowns. Dive in and splash around. http://pewrsr.ch/12z3uZo

Here at Pew Research, we are both a mirror and a window on the world. How can we be even more useful to you? Read this brief post from our own Susannah Fox, then let us know:

  • How were you first introduced to the Pew Research Center?
  • If you follow @SusannahFox, @pewinternet, @pewresearch, or any other Pew Research staffer on Twitter, what do you find useful about those feeds?
  • Do you share our research with other people? If so, how?
  • What would you like to see more of in the future, in terms of dissemination? Videos, e-books, infographics, an API for our aggregated survey data?