The rampant spread of the viral Kony 2012 video: New Pew Research Center analysis
In case you missed it yesterday, a new Pew Research Center report tracks how the “Kony 2012” video and information about it reached so many Americans in a relatively short period of time, and the critical role social media played, especially for adults under age 30.
Fast facts:
27% of young adults first heard about it through social media such as Facebook or Twitter and another 8% learned about it via other internet sources
The internet was more than three times more important as a news-learning platform for young adults than traditional media such as television, newspapers, and radio
For those ages 30-49, the mix of news sources was about even: 22% first learned of the “Kony 2012” video from internet sources – 15% via social media – and 21% learned from traditional media sources
66% of the Twitter conversation from March 5-12 supported the anti-Kony campaign; 17% was skeptical or negative about it; and 16% was neutral (mostly consisting of people asking questions about what was going on)

The rampant spread of the viral Kony 2012 video: New Pew Research Center analysis

In case you missed it yesterday, a new Pew Research Center report tracks how the “Kony 2012” video and information about it reached so many Americans in a relatively short period of time, and the critical role social media played, especially for adults under age 30.

Fast facts:

  • 27% of young adults first heard about it through social media such as Facebook or Twitter and another 8% learned about it via other internet sources
  • The internet was more than three times more important as a news-learning platform for young adults than traditional media such as television, newspapers, and radio
  • For those ages 30-49, the mix of news sources was about even: 22% first learned of the “Kony 2012” video from internet sources – 15% via social media – and 21% learned from traditional media sources
  • 66% of the Twitter conversation from March 5-12 supported the anti-Kony campaign; 17% was skeptical or negative about it; and 16% was neutral (mostly consisting of people asking questions about what was going on)