pewresearch:

The financial challenges of the journalism industry have resulted in significant declines in the number of employed reporters, editors, anchors and photographers. Minority journalists, who were already underrepresented in newsrooms, have, for the most part, experienced the same type of decline in recent years. The National Association of Black Journalists, founded in 1975, meets in Boston this week for its annual convention. Here are some facts about the state of black and minority journalists.

pewresearch:

The financial challenges of the journalism industry have resulted in significant declines in the number of employed reporters, editors, anchors and photographers. Minority journalists, who were already underrepresented in newsrooms, have, for the most part, experienced the same type of decline in recent years. The National Association of Black Journalists, founded in 1975, meets in Boston this week for its annual convention. Here are some facts about the state of black and minority journalists.

Tags: pewresearch

Here are 6 facts about Facebook to tide you over while you anxiously await its return.

The first video uploaded to YouTube was an explanation of what’s cool about elephants. Posted by co-founder Jawed Karim on April 23, 2005.

#throwbackthursday

More Web history

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of U.S. newspapers had at least one woman in their top three editing positions in 2013, according to the new annual census from the American Society of News Editors (ASNE).
The overall count of full-time daily newspaper staffers dropped to about 36,700 from about 38,000 last year — down about 3%.
More in a new Fact Tank post.

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of U.S. newspapers had at least one woman in their top three editing positions in 2013, according to the new annual census from the American Society of News Editors (ASNE).

The overall count of full-time daily newspaper staffers dropped to about 36,700 from about 38,000 last year — down about 3%.

More in a new Fact Tank post.

"Many of the evolutionary advantages in the future will be to people who don’t necessarily have lots of facts in their head but have a lot of capacity to do critical thinking and are discerning searchers. They can figure out relatively quickly and well the difference between highly credible information and highly suspect information."

— Our director Lee Rainie, on Brains, Automation, and the Internet.

The question of the day.

Tags: web25

"By 2025, we should have around 8.1 billion people online. Just imagine all those billions of people and ideas sharing and collaborating. Please don’t let me get hit by a bus. I want to live to experience this period which people will later call the Age of Collaboration."

Tiffany Shlain, filmmaker, host of the AOL series “The Future Starts Here” and founder of The Webby Awards, on what the future of the internet holds.

Friday thought of the day: What does the future hold for creativity/innovation?

In light of Twitter’s diversity report release yesterday, a look at our latest demographic breakdown of those who use the social networking site.
More: Ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet?

In light of Twitter’s diversity report release yesterday, a look at our latest demographic breakdown of those who use the social networking site.

More: Ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet?

pewresearch:

A new survey of 1,300 local television news directors produced by RTDNA and Hofstra University paints a mixed picture of the staffing and spending patterns in local television news. 

pewresearch:

new survey of 1,300 local television news directors produced by RTDNA and Hofstra University paints a mixed picture of the staffing and spending patterns in local television news. 

npr:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts
Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.
Image: iStockphoto

Access to digital accounts after death varies state to state: http://pewrsr.ch/1myyCHA

npr:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts

Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.

Image: iStockphoto

Access to digital accounts after death varies state to state: http://pewrsr.ch/1myyCHA

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.
Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Want more WWW history? Check out our Web history timeline.

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Want more WWW history? Check out our Web history timeline.

(Source: explore-blog)

We’ve just updated our social networking fact sheet with some 2014 numbers; good time for a reminder that we’ve got a series of fast-fact tip sheets at your disposal for grab ‘n go tech stats: http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheets/

Plus, handy dandy charts of key tech indicators and their growth over time: http://www.pewinternet.org/three-technology-revolutions/

We’ve got the data, yes we do.

In 37 of the 44 countries surveyed in 2014 by the Pew Research Center, half or more of the public disapproves of American drone strikes. Israel (65%), Kenya (53%) and the U.S. (52%) are the only countries where at least half back the use of drones against suspected terrorists.
More

In 37 of the 44 countries surveyed in 2014 by the Pew Research Center, half or more of the public disapproves of American drone strikes. Israel (65%), Kenya (53%) and the U.S. (52%) are the only countries where at least half back the use of drones against suspected terrorists.

More

Tags: drones