Pew Internet

Jul 25

How Has the Internet Worked Out So Far? -

The question of the day.

“By 2025, we should have around 8.1 billion people online. Just imagine all those billions of people and ideas sharing and collaborating. Please don’t let me get hit by a bus. I want to live to experience this period which people will later call the Age of Collaboration.” —

Tiffany Shlain, filmmaker, host of the AOL series “The Future Starts Here” and founder of The Webby Awards, on what the future of the internet holds.

Friday thought of the day: What does the future hold for creativity/innovation?

Jul 24

In light of Twitter’s diversity report release yesterday, a look at our latest demographic breakdown of those who use the social networking site.
More: Ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet?

In light of Twitter’s diversity report release yesterday, a look at our latest demographic breakdown of those who use the social networking site.

More: Ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet?

Jul 23

pewresearch:

A new survey of 1,300 local television news directors produced by RTDNA and Hofstra University paints a mixed picture of the staffing and spending patterns in local television news. 

pewresearch:

new survey of 1,300 local television news directors produced by RTDNA and Hofstra University paints a mixed picture of the staffing and spending patterns in local television news. 

npr:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts
Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.
Image: iStockphoto

Access to digital accounts after death varies state to state: http://pewrsr.ch/1myyCHA

npr:

"A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We’re Gone" via Molly Roberts

Ancient peoples sent their dead to the grave with their prized possessions — precious stones, gilded weapons and terracotta armies. But unlike these treasures, our digital property won’t get buried with us. Our archived Facebook messages, old email chains and even Tinder exchanges will hover untouched in the online cloud when we die.

Image: iStockphoto

Access to digital accounts after death varies state to state: http://pewrsr.ch/1myyCHA

Jul 21

[video]

Jul 18

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.
Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Want more WWW history? Check out our Web history timeline.

explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, signing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

Want more WWW history? Check out our Web history timeline.

Jul 17

[video]

Jul 15

In 37 of the 44 countries surveyed in 2014 by the Pew Research Center, half or more of the public disapproves of American drone strikes. Israel (65%), Kenya (53%) and the U.S. (52%) are the only countries where at least half back the use of drones against suspected terrorists.
More

In 37 of the 44 countries surveyed in 2014 by the Pew Research Center, half or more of the public disapproves of American drone strikes. Israel (65%), Kenya (53%) and the U.S. (52%) are the only countries where at least half back the use of drones against suspected terrorists.

More

4 states account for half of the nation’s wiretapping activity, according to a new report from the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts. The report found that the wiretaps led to 3,744 persons arrested in 2013.
Read more in this state-by-state analysis of where the U.S. wiretap hotspots are

4 states account for half of the nation’s wiretapping activity, according to a new report from the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts. The report found that the wiretaps led to 3,744 persons arrested in 2013.

Read more in this state-by-state analysis of where the U.S. wiretap hotspots are

Jul 14

A number of the experts canvassed in our most recent survey on the future of the internet say they expect that if corporations are permitted to operate differentiated services online it will lead to such threats as the blocking of some content, the favoring of some content over other material, and monopoly-style pricing.
FCC Special Counsel for External Affairs Gigi Sohn is currently taking questions via Twitter about The FCC’s net neutrality proceeding. Follow along with #netneutrality.

A number of the experts canvassed in our most recent survey on the future of the internet say they expect that if corporations are permitted to operate differentiated services online it will lead to such threats as the blocking of some content, the favoring of some content over other material, and monopoly-style pricing.

FCC Special Counsel for External Affairs Gigi Sohn is currently taking questions via Twitter about The FCC’s net neutrality proceeding. Follow along with #netneutrality.

Jul 11

The Fact Tank Chart of the Week: A new U.S. Census Bureau interactive explores the relationship between college majors & occupations.
Noteworthy: More engineering majors are non-STEM managers (18%) than computer workers (15%). And only about 26% of physical-sciences majors work in any STEM occupation at all; their biggest employment categories are health care (17%), non-STEM managerial jobs (14%) and education (12%). 

The Fact Tank Chart of the Week: A new U.S. Census Bureau interactive explores the relationship between college majors & occupations.

Noteworthy: More engineering majors are non-STEM managers (18%) than computer workers (15%). And only about 26% of physical-sciences majors work in any STEM occupation at all; their biggest employment categories are health care (17%), non-STEM managerial jobs (14%) and education (12%). 

[video]

Jul 09

Many library staff members say they see the role of a public library enabling access to information, regardless of format. 
Our data shows that 91% of Americans have either used a public library at some point in their life, or say someone else in their household uses a public library. Among them, 77% of Americans who use the internet but lack home access say computer and internet access at their public library is important to them and their family.
An article in the New York Times yesterday explored some of the ways patrons of the Clason’s Point Library branch in the Bronx rely on the library’s internet access—even when the library itself is closed.
Read more

Many library staff members say they see the role of a public library enabling access to information, regardless of format. 

Our data shows that 91% of Americans have either used a public library at some point in their life, or say someone else in their household uses a public library. Among them, 77% of Americans who use the internet but lack home access say computer and internet access at their public library is important to them and their family.

An article in the New York Times yesterday explored some of the ways patrons of the Clason’s Point Library branch in the Bronx rely on the library’s internet access—even when the library itself is closed.

Read more

NASA's Voyager Spacecraft Has Made History in the Most Remarkable Way -

On Tuesday, NASA made an exciting announcement: Its Voyager 1 spacecraft, which was first launched in 1977, is cruising interstellar space, which the agency describes as “a region between the stars filled with a thin soup of charged particles, also known as plasma.” While Voyager 1 still technically remains within the solar system, this is the furthest that a human spacecraft has ever traveled — and the first time that one has ever entered a new cosmic realm.

Read more

(Source: micdotcom)